Southern Adirondack Wine & Food Festival


Southern Adirondack Wine & Food Festival Logo

 

Sunday, June 12, 2016

1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

2 N. Main Street

Gloversville, NY

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Tastings of wine, cider and whisky

Hudson-Chatham WineryHummingbird Hill WineryLedge Rock Hill WineryPazdar Winery, Nine Pin CiderYankee Distillers

◊ Delicious local food

The Brass Monkey, On A Roll, Mohawk Harvest Co-opNYC PizzaSugar PearlPalatine CheeseIce Delites, Isn’t It SweetThe Nut LadyFork Art

Live music

Chelsea Reeves
GCM Wind Quintet
Baker Brass Trio
Cosby Gibson & Tom Staudle
Doghouse Trio
Penny Jar

Wine seminars

The basics of wine making and wine tasting

Art  and Craft Shows

Primitive Pimp Design
My Inner 1800s 
The Leaning Tree

◊ Architectural tours

In historic downtown Gloversville

◊ Plus….

French-themed Paint N Sip ($5 additional fee for supplies)

The Southern Adirondack Wine & Food Festival is sponsored by:

GOLD SPONSOR:
Fulton County Center for Regional Growth

SILVER SPONSORS:
Adirondack Wood Floor Co.
Mohawk Harvest Co-op
The Still Point Acupuncture

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Downtown Gloversville video shows plans for development

This in-depth video shows the 2016 development plan for downtown Gloversville, NY.

CRG set to reopen loan pool for city

April 20, 2016

By JASON SUBIK , Leader Herald 

GLOVERSVILLE – The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth is set to soon reopen a $900,000 loan pool for city businesses.

“That fund has not been active. We’re going to be creating what will be called the Gloversville Loan Fund and we’re setting up a joint administration of that with the city and CRG,” CRG President Ron Peters said.

Peters said the loan pool, which is made up of money from the federal Urban Development Action Grant-funded loan program, had been inactive since at least 2012 when Gloversville initiated two lawsuits against the CRG and its precursor entities, the Fulton County Economic Development Corp. and the Cross Roads Incubator Corp. Gloversville had given the UDAG money to the Fulton County EDC to administer, but sought the return of the funds in the lawsuit.


I think in business, in the real world, you cut your losses and you move forward. We don’t want to be at war with CRG or anybody else. We want to make partnerships. [The New York Innovative Communities Network’s conference] last week wouldn’t have happened if we’re suing each other.” Gloversville Mayor Dayton King


On April 12 the Common Council voted unanimously to drop the lawsuits, forgiving approximately $1.2 million in Gloversville UDAC loans. These were the loans forgiven: $750,000 for the CIC Estee Commons project; $200,000 to the CIC for the construction of 110 Decker Drive, formerly the site of the CRG’s headquarters; $25,000 to Beebie Printing; and a $179,190 loan the city government had borrowed from the fund. Prior to the loan forgiveness, the 110 Decker Drive project had paid down the principle of its loan to $151,854, Beebie Printing had paid down its loan to $13,562, but neither the city nor the Estee Commons project had paid back any portion of its loans.

Mayor Dayton King said he and the Common Council evaluated the likelihood of recovery of any of the forgiven loans and decided it was in the city’s best interest to end the lawsuits.

“We were probably never going to get any of that money back,” King said. “We also realized that if we ever did get that money, it was never going to go back to our general fund. We did get a project out of it, the Estee Commons project, out of that initial grant money. We could have kept beating our heads against the wall and saying no on principle – that was really the theme from the last Common Council, ‘No, no matter what, this is the right thing to do and I don’t want to explain to my taxpayers why we’re forgiving these loans.’ But I think in business, in the real world, you cut your losses and you move forward. We don’t want to be at war with CRG or anybody else. We want to make partnerships. [The New York Innovative Communities Network’s conference] last week wouldn’t have happened if we’re suing each other.”

Peters said at its peak level, the Gloversville UDAG loan fund had approximately $2.2 million in it. As of Jan. 31, the loan fund has $900,000 in it and has three outstanding loans that are receiving monthly payments:

Peters said Gloversville’s decision to forgive the $1.2 million in non-performing loans was crucial to the CRG’s ability to move forward and reopen the UDAG loan fund.

“The issues had to be straightened out,” he said. “We’re going to create a new board – we haven’t had the organizational meeting yet -but we’re going to sit down and organize our new loan committee and it will be made up of the city and the CRG. We’re going to do this in the next week to 10 days.”

King said the new governance board for the Gloversville UDAG fund will include the mayor of Gloversville, three Common Council members and three members from CRG, giving Gloversville elected officials a one-vote majority control of how the money in the fund will be loaned out.

The largest portion of the forgiven money was $750,000 for the Estee Commons project. Peters said the rules of the federal program that governs UDAG loan pools require the UDAG loan to be paid off last for projects that have multiple funding sources. In the case of the Estee Commons project, the project has a $1.9 million private sector mortgage, which is known as the “first position” in the repayment structure.

Peters said Estee Commons, which now has an occupancy rate of between 93 and 100 percent for its 39 apartments, currently brings in about $21,000 per month in rent revenue after expenses, but has about $19,000 in monthly mortgage payments, not counting taxes or insurance. He said at its current rate of payment it won’t repay its private sector mortgage for at least another 15 years.

Peters said the purpose of the Estee Commons project was to help spark urban renewal in the neighborhood in which it was built, but so far the prevailing market rent rates in that neighborhood have not risen to the level necessary to repay both the private and public sector financing for the project. He said rent revenue would need to be about 60 percent higher than it currently is for it to have reasonably repaid its $1.7 million private sector mortgage and the $750,000 from the Gloversville UDAG loan fund.

Until recently, Estee Commons only had about a 60 percent occupancy rate, which Peters attributes to the CRG having only a two-member staff, down from the eight-member staff the Fulton County EDC had at its peak. Peters said the CRG increased the occupancy rate by hiring Schenectady-based property management company Maddalone & Associates, which is paid about 7 percent of the rent revenues for the site.

Peters said Estee Commons was effectively unsellable so long as the $750,000 UDAG loan was still a lien against the value of the property.

“It would be like buying a $20,000 car and saying ‘I know its worth $20,000, but I’m going to give you $40,000 for it,” he said.

King said the low probability of Estee Commons ever selling for a price high enough to repay the UDAG loan was a key part of the city’s decision to drop the lawsuit.

CRG recently relocated its headquarters from 110 Decker Drive, one of the projects which had a loan forgiven, to the former OHM Laboratories building at 34 W. Fulton St. in Gloversville, a 35,000 square foot location the CRG plans to use as a business incubator.

King said there was never an explicit quid pro quo agreement for Gloversville to forgive the Decker Drive loan and the CRG to move to downtown Gloversville, but he’s glad the organization made the move.

Urban Council zeroes in on downtown Gloversville

downtown gloversville BID

Downtown Gloversville

Downtown Gloversville will be the setting for the quarterly meeting of the NYS Urban Council, a group that facilitates and encourages revitalization and development of central business districts in cities, towns and villages across New York State.

The conference: “Gloversville – Downtowns with a Future – The Making of Places,” will run Thursday, April 14 at 8:30 a.m. to noon on Friday, April 15 at various downtown buildings within walking distance, starting at the NBT Bank Building at 12 North Main Street
Gloversville.

Formed in 1991, the NYS Urban Council gets assistance from the Empire State Development Corporation as it brings together “downtown practitioners” and economic development professionals to share ideas about breathing life into business districts,

The regional meeting in Gloversville is a chance to convene professionals to work together to identify solutions for common issues faced in our communities and business districts.   A peer-based resource, the Council tracks innovative programs and communities, in hopes of being a go-to resource for New York business districts.  This regional meeting is open to downtown and Main Street professionals, their respective board members and businesses and the like to come learn in this “live” learning laboratory.   The planned “Live Learning Laboratory” program will be fast-paced, with peer-to-peer exchanges, lively speakers, peer professional social opportunities and best (and not-so-good) practice examples.

Holiday Inn Gloversville/Johnstown

Holiday Inn Johnstown/Gloversville

Organizers are putting together an informal gathering opportunity for those who plan to arrive the night before on April 13. Contact the local hosts, Vince DeSantis of the City of Gloversville, vdesantis48@icloud.com or Ron Peters, Fulton County Center for Regional Growth 518-725-7700.

Tickets are $75 for the full conference or $25 for the Thursday night dinner and presentation only. Tickets may be purchased online here (with an added EventBrite handling fee.)

The Holiday Inn Johnstown/Gloversville is offering a $90 room rate  April 13 -15 for participants who mention NYS Urban Council/INNCOM (308 N Comrie Ave, Johnstown, NY 12095 (518) 762-4686).

 

Program at a Glance

Thursday, April 14, 2016

8:30 a.m. Registration Open with Complimentary Breakfast at former City National Bank building 12 N Main St, Gloversville, NY 12078 

9:15 a.m. Welcoming Remarks 

9:45 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Break Out Sessions

Workshop Option A — “Raising the Quality of Life for Living in your Downtown with Crime Prevention” at the former City National Bank / NBT Bank Building 12 N Main St, Gloversville, NY 12078


Topics include -

  • Community Policing and Crime Prevention in your Downtown
  • Panel: Neighborhood police programs. The first line of economic development in your downtown is dealing with perception and the safety of your center city.

Workshop Option B — “The Making of a Place is all about Messaging”

  • Panel: Marketing, special events, outreach. What are the tools to building a vibrant life in town? Experts in downtown programming and marketing will speak of the tools and techniques they use to affect positive messaging and create a sense of place in their communities.
glove marquee

The Glove Theatre


12:00 p.m.
 Luncheon at The Glove Performing Arts Center, 42 N Main St, Gloversville
During lunch, the Committee for Gloversville’s Downtown will give a status update and ask members of the local business community, participants and downtown practitioners from across the state to share ideas to help shape the host community’s plans for the future.

1:45 p.m. Afternoon Sessions

Workshop C — “Innovative Programming for your Community”

  • What others are doing to fill the gap or at least encourage the gap be filled; pop-up retail, food trucks, place-making, alternative energy, car sharing, bike sharing, incentives, office to residential conversions 

Workshop D — “Chamber Rotunda-Camp Fire Session”

  • Sit around the campfire (indoors) and discuss the challenges of bringing a “Creative Class” sector to life in your community. Discuss with your peers what they are doing in their communities to bring about change in food, the arts, creativity in development, technology and education into the heart of town.  

3:15 p.m. Walking Tour of Downtown followed by tour of Schine Memorial Hall - Meet at Chamber Building.

 

5:00 p.m. Reception and Dinner at the Eccentric Club

  • cocktails cash bar, followed by a buffet dinner.  
Cooperative Market in downtown Gloversville.

Mohawk Harvest Cooperative Market in downtown Gloversville

Friday, April 15, 2016

8:15 to 9:45 a.m. Urban Council Board Meeting (for Urban Council Board Members)

9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Non Board Members meet for breakfast at Mohawk Harvest Cooperative

Morning Program

  • Statewide & Region-by-Region Coffee Chat

Conference speakers, panel details and requests:

Anthony Capece Albany Central BID: 518-462-4300

100 years of great businesses in Fulton County

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan  The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth's free networking event entitled "Business Jubilee" celebrated Fulton County businesses that have been in business for 50 years or more.

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan
The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth’s free networking event entitled “Business Jubilee” celebrated Fulton County businesses that have been in business for 50 years or more.

Fulton County Center for Regional growth celebrated the “deep roots, strong hearts and unbridled optimism” of the county’s most venerable businesses at a Business Jubilee in November.

With generous support from community sponsors, the FCCRG highlighted and honored 29 businesses and organizations that have operated in Fulton County for 50 years or more.

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan  Jack Scott of WENT radio speaks during the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth's "Business Jubilee."

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan
Jack Scott of WENT radio speaks during the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth’s “Business Jubilee.”

Jack Scott of WENT Radio, noted: “The businesses represented here tonight have survived and thrived. And only the strong survive.”

Scott described the common threads all the businesses share: strength of character, the ability to adapt, dedication, optimism, resilience, a commitment to serve their markets with outstanding products and customer service.

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan  FCCRG President Ron Peters

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan
FCCRG President Ron Peters

About 150 people attended the networking event, which was a part of an ongoing effort by the CRG to show the advantages Fulton County has fostered for more than a century to entrepreneurs looking for places to settle and expand. At the same time, the event supported and encouraged the growth and strength of existing businesses.

“It’s about working together – 2016 is the year of cooperation and collaboration,” CRG President Ron Peters said.

The CRG had a poster made describing the history of each honoree business. To order a commemorative booklet of all of the posters from the event, please contact Becky either by phone or email (518-725-7700 or beckyh@fccrg.org).

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan  Jeannie Moller, left, and her daughter Amie Waddle, both of Caroga, look at a display which features Bowman's Market in Gloversville during the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth's free networking event entitled "Business Jubilee."

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan
Jeannie Moller, left, and her daughter Amie Waddle, both of Caroga, look at a display which features Bowman’s Market in Gloversville during the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth’s “Business Jubilee.”

77 years: Bowman’s Market, 50 East Pine Street, Gloversville
54 years: Brown’s Ford, 121 North Comrie Avenue, Johnstown
64 years: Capano’s Barber Shop, 27 West Fulton Street, Gloversville
100 years: Century Linen & Uniform, 335 North Main Street, Gloversville
161 years: Cherry Valley Memorials, 141 South Main Street, Gloversville
59 years: Coldwell Banker Realty, 363 North Comrie Avenue, Johnstown
51 years: Derby Office Equipment, 25 North Arlington Ave., Gloversville
136 years: Frontier Communications, 137 Harrison Street Gloversville
51 years: Fulton County Board of Realtors, 32 Spring Street, Gloversville
123 years: Fulton County YMCA, 213 Harrison Street, Gloversville
96 years: Fulton Montgomery Chamber of Commerce, 2 North Main Street, Gloversville
76 years: Glove Cities Veterinary Hospital, 35 Harrison Street, Gloversville
101 years: Glove Theatre, 42 North Main Street, Gloversville
135 years: Gloversville Public Library, 58 East Fulton Street, Gloversville
125 years: Gloversville Sewing Center, 50 East Pine Street, Gloversville
62 years: Lexington ARC, 127 East State Street, Gloversville
81 years: Lohse Florist, 93 East State Street, Gloversville
97 years: Main Motorcar, 224 West Main Street, Johnstown
90 years: Mr. G’s Hair Gallery, 55 West Fulton Street, Gloversville
79 years: New York Lunch, 21 Bleecker Street, Gloversville
57 years: Robert M. Halgas Funeral Home, 111 County Highway 140, Johnstown
93 years: Rossbach Shoe, 10 West Fulton Street, Gloversville
66 years: Ruby & Quiri, 307 North Comrie Avenue, Johnstown
202 years: Saltsman’s Hotel, 104 County Highway 140, Fort Plain
107 years: Taylor Made Group, 66 Kingsboro Avenue, Gloversville
128 years: The Leader Herald, 8 East Fulton Street, Gloversville
71 years: WENT Radio, 138 Harrison Street Ext., Gloversville
75 years: WEST & Company, 97 North Main Street, Gloversville
107 years: Willing Helpers Home for Women, 226 West Madison Avenue, Johnstown

“I’m surprised by the amount of people who came out. It’s positive and uplifting,” said Richard Smith, owner of Century Linen and Uniform Service. The business – until this year known as Robison & Smith – has been operating in Fulton County for 100 years.

“It’s really good to showcase hometown businesses, to look at what they’re doing right,” Gloversville 5th Ward Supervisor Greg Young said.

The CRG is grateful for the generous support of the following businesses who made this event possible to be free and open to the public.

  • Century Sponsor: The Leader Herald
  • Golden Age Sponsor: Patriot Federal Bank
  • Jubilee Sponsors: Lexington, Fulton County Chapter, NYSARC Inc.;
  • West & Company; Nathan Littauer Hospital and Nursing Home; Frontier Communications
  • Sweets Sponsor: Fulton County Board of Realtors
  • Carving Station Sponsors: Ruby & Quiri; Wells Fargo Advisors

Fulton BoardofRealtors logoR&Q logows_logo WEST-Logo
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Official Logo Black and White, NLHFrontier

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See local newspaper coverage By MORGAN FRISCH in The Leader Herald    

Calling Fulton County Businesses Over 50

Fulton County is a great place to live and do business. The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth is celebrating a cross section of its community that has shown loyalty and commitment for 50 or more years.

If you are one of these special Fulton County businesses, please let us know by sharing your story with us in this online form. We’ll make a display of your accomplishments at

The Fulton County Business Jubilee
Friday, November 13, 2015
Holiday Inn, Johnstown at 6:00 p.m.

Main Motorcar

The Business Jubilee will celebrate businesses with 50 or more years of commitment to Fulton County, NY.

This event is free and open to the public thanks to the support of a growing cadre of generous sponsors. We do need an RSVP from those who will be attending by November 9, 2015, via email or by calling  518-725-7700 Ext. 100.

The evening will feature a presentation by CRG President and CEO Ronald Peters and select business owners. Guests will be treated to an array of hors d’oeuvres and food stations courtesy of event sponsors. Additional sponsorship opportunities are still available.

Gloversville Library Gets Pulitzer Prize winner’s support

gloversville-library-NY

An extensive article in the New York Times about Pulitzer Prize winning author Richard Russo’s support of the Gloversville Free Library is boosting the historic institution’s efforts at renovation and reinvention.

Russo, who grew up in Fulton County, has used Gloversville and his impressions of it for such novels as “Empire Falls,” “Nobody’s Fool” and “Mohawk,” even when the books were ostensibly set in a different fictional location.

He grew up going to the Gloversville library, he told the New York Times; “I have such fond memories of the place, going there Saturday mornings with my grandfather or mother, who would wait forever for me to pick books. I just have this feeling that if it weren’t for the Gloversville Free Library that I probably would not be a writer.”

$2.4 Million Raised So Far

Local fundraising efforts have so far raised $2.4 million of the $7 million needed for the first-ever renovation of the 111-year-old Beaux Arts building. Town leaders have started fund drives for capital repairs to the library three times in recent decades – in the 1970s, 1995 and 2003, but the efforts did not produce enough donations for the job.

“This time we’re not giving up,” Barbara Madonna, the library’s executive director, told NYT reporter Steven Greenhouse. “We need to do this renovation for the kids. A library is so important for them. And we need to do this as a catalyst to lift the whole town.”


“I just have this feeling that if it weren’t for the Gloversville Free Library that I probably would not be a writer.” — Pulitzer Prize Winning Novelist Richard Russo


Since the last fundraising effort, the library became an independent entity, rather than a department of the city government. It shifted its funding stream from the city budget to a direct tax approved by voters each year along with the Gloversville Enlarged School District budget. Those changes made the library’s funding more stable, allowing it the breathing space to pursue a new capital campaign.

The library’s boiler is 100 years old, the wood shelving is decrepit, and the library has neither a wheelchair ramp nor air-conditioning. But architecturally, it is a shining jewel smack dab in the center of Gloversville’s downtown. It was built with a $50,000 donation by steel baron Andrew Carnegie in 1904. Its soaring 35-foot-tall lobby is the focal point of a vibrant community haven that already attracts about 9,000 visitors a month for library transactions, toddler story times, reading and knitting groups and “unplugged” activities for teenagers.

In addition to replacing the century-old boiler with forced air HVAC, the restoration project includes upgrades to plumbing, electrical and lighting systems, installing an elevator for access to all three floors (only one floor is currently used) and making the building handicapped accessible.  A cozy reading room, a children’s section with atrium windows, five public meeting rooms and a concert space are envisioned.

richard-russo

“One reason Mr. Russo is so interested in the renovation is there’s very little place for children these days outside of school,” said Elizabeth Batchelor, a chairwoman of the fund-raising campaign, told the NYT.  “For many kids, a library can be a ladder out of poverty.”

According to a story in The Daily Gazette of Schenectady, the New York Times article sparked a renewed interest in the fundraising campaign from individuals and potentially, from a foundation.

Russo’s role as honorary chairman is largely symbolic – he lives in Maine and is working on his next novel. But his involvement has raised the project’s profile beyond the 15,000 residents of Gloversville to a national audience that may be willing to support the library’s mission and the preservation of the historic building.

Mohawk Valley Land Bank is Encouraged

Herkimer County has officially encouraged a plan to create a six-county, not-for-profit corporation that would be allowed to acquire and improve derelict properties.

The proposed land bank would have the power to acquire vacant sites, rundown and abandoned properties and tax delinquent parcels. It would also have the power to borrow money to secure the sites and find buyers interested in making the properties productive.KMVB LOGO

Under a state law enacted in 2011, any tax district with foreclosure powers is eligible to form a not-for-profit land bank with approval from the state’s urban development corporation. The idea behind a Mohawk Valley Land Bank is that a regional public authority would have more focus and greater resources to make sure the properties aren’t disposed of at far less than they are worth. The authority could also work with buyers to make sure the properties are secured and redeveloped, rather than persisting in dereliction and tax delinquency.

The Keep Mohawk Valley Beautiful (KMVB) committee of the Mohawk Valley Economic Development District has so far held three informational meetings in Johnstown, Herkimer and Oneonta exploring the creation of a land bank to include Fulton, Herkimer, Montgomery, Oneida, Otsego and Schoharie counties.  A proposed land bank is one of four parts of KMVB’s anti-blight campaign, which also encompasses the use of the Keep America Beautiful Community Appearance Index, the Great American Cleanup and Adopt a Spot.

The Herkimer County Legislature passed a resolution Feb. 18 to encourage continued investigation of forming a regional land bank. According to the MVEDD, state legislation allows for 20 land banks in New York, and 11 land banks have already been approved. There are 120 land banks in the nation.

On Tuesday, March 3, the group will hold an informational meeting at SUNY Oneonta’s Red Dragon Theater, 108 Ravine Parkway, Oneonta. All meetings begin at 6:30 PM.

“Blight is a problem in communities everywhere, and Keep Mohawk Valley Beautiful (KMVB) is doing something about it,” said Bob Albrecht, chair of the KMVB Board of Directors.

Steve Smith, executive director of MVEDD, said, “Municipalities are looking for help in dealing with blight, whether it is rubbish along the streets or abandoned houses. We think our six-county network together with KMVB volunteers can make a difference.”

 For more information

Mohawk Valley Economic Development District

Keep Mohawk Valley Beautiful’s Facebook page

New York State Land Banks: Combating Blight and Vacancy in New York Communities – PDF

Vacant Properties: The True Costs to Communities – PDF

2011 New York State Land Bank Enabling Legislation – PDF

Land Bank Guidelines -PDF

 

Gloversville Office and Retail Buildings

Gloversville New York downtown buildings

CW Rose Building in Downtown Gloversville NY

The City of Gloversville has some amazing commercial buildings that any small city in the country would be proud to have on their Main Street. Most seem to be in excellent shape and looking for small retail and professional businesses to move back to Downtown.

Downtown Gloversville – Fulton Street

Fulton County NY

Gloversville is full of exceptional building for retail and office space.

 

Gloversville

Gloversville, New York

Downtown District in Gloversville NY. Beautiful buildings and architecture with many available storefronts waiting for incredible businesses to join the community.