WRGB sees growth potential for Fulton County

They’re both headquartered in our area.

The center of Fulton County is about 45 miles from Albany, and with two successful businesses operating there, right now county leaders are hoping to attract even more companies.

Vireo Health CEO Ari Hoffnung was born and raised in New York City, but he decided to manufacture medical marijuana in the quiet countryside of Johnstown.

“Got a great deal on 20 acres and now we have enough space our business can grow into,” Hoffnung said.

Security is extremely important for a medical marijuana operation, which is why Hoffnung says this was a prime location, an old youth corrections facility.

The old inmate living quarters now house the plants used to make kosher forms of the state-regulated drug.

Hoffnung says he saw an opportunity to bring the old Tryon Juvenile Prison buildings back to life, and put Fulton County residents back to work.

“Hundreds of jobs were lost and being able to bring jobs back was extraordinarily important,” Hoffnung said.

But now Hoffnung is looking for neighbors on the prison property, which has been transformed into the Tryon Technology Park, several hundred acres of shovel-ready space.

“We would welcome biotech companies we would welcome medical device companies it’s a great place to do business,” Hoffnung said.

County Planning Director Jim Mraz says the county’s been working to prepare the land in two nearby areas, Hales Mills and Vail Mills, for anticipated residential growth.

“We’re looking at upwards of 900 housing units county-wide in demand,” Mraz said.

They’re hoping the success of Fage yogurt, headquartered just eight miles from the medical marijuana site, will also help businesses look their way.

“We’re so proud they’re here, and we’d like to see more companies like that,” Mraz said.

County leaders say one of their biggest challenges is changing perception. Because the county is mostly rural, leaders say folks tend to think it’s hours away from the Capital Region, but the drive to Johnstown about 40 minutes from Schenectady.

by Anne McCloy, WRGB 6News Albany

Wednesday, June 21st 2017

WNYT finds Fulton County Posi+tive

Presentations highlight business opportunities in Fulton County

June 21, 2017 05:56 PM

PERTH – Fulton County wants companies to know it is open for business. County officials highlighted shovel-ready areas around the county for businesses to move in at a presentation Wednesday. The county highlighted those opportunities at Tryon Technology Park, and branded their new slogan – Fulton County: Posi+ive.

It may seem like an unusual place for a rebirth, an old juvenile detention facility. But at the Tryon Technology Park, Fulton County sees a bright business future for the county. “It was really a day to talk about investment opportunities, real estate development opportunities that we have here in Fulton County, readily available,” said James Mraz, Fulton County’s Planning Director.

The county brought in members of the Commercial and Industrial Real Estate Brokers to talk about opportunities for businesses and families in Fulton County. “We know what we’re doing, we know the opportunities that are here, but it doesn’t do us any good to know them and not for everybody else to,” said Mraz.

The county is focusing on three main sites. A planned residential and retail development in Johnstown and other in Mayfield. But the main area they focused on Wednesday was the Tryon Technology Park in the Town of Perth. The county got the property after the detention facility shut down in 2011. They’ve spent the last two years, and more than five million dollars, getting it ready for business.

“It’s one thing to have the land available, but if that land isn’t supported by the infrastructure it’s really not shovel-ready,” said Mraz. One tenant is already at the Technology Park: Vireo Health. A medical marijuana grower licensed by the state, the company credits the county for their growth.

“Fulton County and its IDA have been true partners to us,” said Ari Hoffnung, CEO of Vireo Health of NY, LLC. “We couldn’t do what we’re doing without their support.”

Vireo praised the county’s investments at Tryon, and say they’re ready for new tenants to come in. “Infrastructure here is top notch when it comes to power, when it comes to water, when it comes to high speed internet access,” said Hoffnung. “And it’s getting a little lonely so we would love a few more neighbors.”

Credits

Ben Amey

Copyright 2017 – WNYT-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

CRG talks could lead to more Fulton County jobs

One local manufacturer could add 50 new Fulton County jobs

Insight into CRG operations was part of the agency’s monthly activities report given last week to the Fulton County supervisors.

CRG President and CEO Ronald Peters said the CRG received an inquiry from a “potential start-up” knitting operation located in the New York City area.

He said Tuesday he hasn’t heard back from the company and he’s not sure where it will settle.

Peters also alluded to other recent CRG business marketing efforts. He said the agency is working with an unidentified “local manufacturer” that created 10 new jobs last month and wants to expand further. He said he brought in a state Economic Development Corp. representative to start exploring an opportunity for the state to offer a financing package to the county.

“I’m still working with the state on that package,” Peters said.

He said there is a possibility this could be a “regionally-significant project” with 50 or more jobs.

Peters reported he met with a former small local manufacturer about potentially starting up again.

He said the CRG also received an out-of-state inquiry that was passed on to an unnamed local manufacturer.

The CRG worked with an engineering firm and submitted a $300,000 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant application for the city of Gloversville.

Peters said he met with Northville Mayor John Spaeth, Northampton Supervisor James Groff and a potential Main Street Program applicant about a possible project in Northville.

The CRG’s 2013-15 Microenterprise Grant generated 19 jobs among small businesses in the county, Peters said. The state has granted the CRG an extension to the end of 2017 so approved applicants can complete job requirements.

Peters said the 2016 Microenterprise Grant program recently gave out its first grant to Gloversville-based Frozen Parts Inc. The company fabricates and assembles more than 500 of the most asked-for parts, its website says.

The CRG’s County Loan Pool still has several applications out in various stages, Peters said. He said he recently met with more potential applicants.

Peters said the CRG continues to work with Saratoga Springs-based marketing agency Shannon Rose, which updates the CRG website. The firm is also managing the CRG’s Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Working with the county’s lead-generating firm, Peters said the CRG made “several” calls to companies explaining the benefits of locating in Fulton County.

The CRG also participated in a similar Qualified Lead Generating Initiative with New York state. Peters said the CRG had three conference calls with a company looking at potentially moving to the state.

Michael Anich covers Johnstown and Fulton County news. He can be reached at manich@leaderherald.com.

Gloversville microbrewery takes shape 

Microbrewery to open in Gloversville: From left, Matt Sherman, Nick Sherman and Casey Oare, the brains and muscle behind Stump City Brewing. PHOTOGRAPHER: DANIEL FITZSIMMONS

Microbrewery to open in Gloversville: From left, Matt Sherman, Nick Sherman and Casey Oare, the brains and muscle behind Stump City Brewing. PHOTOGRAPHER: DANIEL FITZSIMMONS

Originally published in The Daily Gazette

By Daniel Fitzsimmons, December 18, 2016

For brothers Matt and Nick Sherman, along with their childhood friend, Casey Oare, nearly every weekend for the past three years has been spent building a shared dream conceived nearly six years ago in the Shermans’ garage: to open a brewery together that Gloversville could call its own.

Standing in the now-functioning brewery and taproom recently, which lacked only the finishing touches, the trio — and Stump City Brewing — have come a long way from the garage where they experimented with different homebrew recipes and fantasized about doing something bigger.

“Our motto is ‘from the ground up,’” said Matt Sherman, 34, a reference to the do it yourself-ethos that informs nearly everything they do, from building the structure that houses the brewery and taproom themselves to slogging through the mountains of state and federal paperwork required to operate a brewery.

The other defining feature of Stump City Brewing is their devotion to Gloversville and the surrounding area, and their drive to source everything — from the ingredients in their beer to construction materials — locally.

The bar in the taproom is made from the trees that were cleared to make way for their building. The ceiling is lined with corrugated sheet metal, giving it a rustic look, that a friend had stockpiled and given them. The plank floor is made of reclaimed wood from a nearby house that was gutted.

The project took three years’ worth of weekends because all three men have day jobs. Matt Sherman is a school counselor, Nick Sherman sells bus parts, and Oare is a paramedic and firefighter. Weekends were all spent bringing the dream to life.

Stump City is also taking advantage of New York’s farm brewing law, which provides incentives like decreased permitting requirements to New York-based brewers in exchange for the brewers sourcing a portion of their ingredients inside the state. The purpose of the law is to spur hop and grain production in the state and increase demand for local products.

Under the farm brewery law, at least 20 percent of the brewery’s hops must come from inside the state, and 20 percent of all other ingredients must be native to New York. Those ratios increase to 90 percent each in 2024.

But the Shermans and Oare are already there, sourcing 90 percent of their grain bill from a farm outside Rochester, and all of their hops — for now — from Goddard Tree Farm in Johnstown. Nick Sherman, 30, said there’s a need for increased hop and grain production in the state, which is ideal for growing such crops.

“It’s just a matter of convincing these farmers that there’s money to be made in growing those crops,” said Nick Sherman. “The startup costs are high.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, their name is local too. Before the area was called Gloversville it was known as “Stump City,” after all the trees that had been cut down to supply bark for the leather tanning process.

The brewery is located on West Fulton Street extension, behind the Sherman family home on land donated by the Shermans’ dad, Jerry Sherman, who is also a partner in the brewery and provided funds to help get the project off the ground.

“We grew up playing in these woods,” said Nick Sherman, looking out the back door of the brewery.

About $13,000 in additional funds was raised through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, which Matt Sherman said was crucial to the finishing of the brewery.
“Without the Indiegogo this wouldn’t have happened,” he said, noting that contributors, depending on how much they donated, will receive perks like Stump City clothing and gear or even the chance to brew an original beer.

And while other crowdfunding campaigns might draw donations from around the world, virtually all of the donations made to Stump City were from friends, relatives and others within the group’s orbit.

“I don’t think there’s one donor we don’t know,” said Matt Sherman. “The support in the community has been huge.”

“We all grew up here,” said Casey Oare, 31. “And for the people who stayed there’s a certain amount of pride being from the area, and we want to be a part of that.”

The group’s goal is to sell beer in their taproom and at local beverage centers where people can fill up their growlers — large, reusable glass containers used to store beer for personal use — with Stump City beer. Eventually they’d like for the brewery to support one of them as a full-time employee, and from there start increasing capacity, which currently stands at around 31 gallons per batch.

They currently have three brews that will be in regular rotation at the taproom; their Cayadutta Cream Ale, which they said is a good entry point to craft beer, a pale ale and a red ale.

Oare said there’s lots of buzz around when the taproom will open, and that he gets questioned by local residents on when they’ll be able to come in for a beer.
“Everybody wants to know when we’re opening,” Oare said.

The group said they want to do a soft opening for family, friends and supporters in the coming weeks, and open the taproom to the general public in the spring.
But they’re in no rush. The Shermans and Oare take a lot of pride in the beer they make, their local roots, and building something that those in Gloversville and the surrounding area can take a measure of ownership in.

“We want to make people proud,” said Matt Sherman. “We want people to be able to say, ‘that’s my beer.’”

Fulton County working to rebuild local economy: Times Union

Officials market low costs, infrastructure to attract companies, people

 By Robert Downen, Originally published in the Albany Times Union

In their quest to reverse economic downturn, Fulton County officials are focusing on three words: Live, work and play.

By 2026, they hope their county will attract residents who want to do all three.

Once the epicenter of the upstate leather industry centered in Gloversville, Fulton County has steadily watched economic opportunities dwindle as niche manufacturing jobs go overseas.

Since 1970, the number of people directly and indirectly employed in the leather trades has dropped from 10,000 to 400, the U.S. Department of Labor said.

“These businesses employed towns,” Johnny Evers, director of government affairs at the Business Council of New York State, said at a seminar on Fulton County economic development Tuesday,

Now — and hopefully, with buy-in from local business leaders and elected officials — county officials are hoping they can transform the area into a hotbed of growth by attracting businesses and young people alike.

Boosters believe they have the resources both in infrastructure and human capital. The question is how to get people to use them.

The pitch is simple: Cheap cost of living, coupled with the factory buildings left over from the heyday of manufacturing, should make Fulton County immediately attractive to those seeking metropolitan amenities at a discounted rate.

“Upstate New York is a beautiful place to explore and enjoy, but in many areas the cost of living can be too high,” Jim Mraz, Fulton County planning director, said in August. “In Fulton County, that’s not the case, and that’s something we’re proud of.”

Add in a low crime rate, a new focus on regional partnerships and the county’s location in the middle of myriad nature destinations, and officials are confident they “can establish Fulton County as one of the Capital Region’s premier economic and residential destinations,” said Charles Potter, chairman of the Fulton County Board of Supervisors.

Since undertaking the development initiative called Jump Start Fulton County in 2014, officials have focused heavily on luring new businesses and young workers to shovel-ready sites.

Fulton and Montgomery counties at that time brought in Mike Mullis, a corporate site selector, to assess the region’s ability to attract large corporations. Mullis identified seven clusters on which the counties should focus, with biomedical research and development, food and beverage services and health care products among them.

By reorienting towards such high-tech sectors, officials hope they can use their location in the middle of what they’re calling the “Tech Triangle” of New York as a selling point. (Both Utica and the Capital Region tout significant biotechnology sectors, and Albany was rated last week as the most friendly place to do business in New York by Forbes).

A cornerstone of that strategy is the Tryon Technology Park in Perth. The 515-acre park, once occupied by the now-shuttered Tryon Detention Center, has been the focus of the Fulton County Industrial Development Agency. Last year it moved in its first tenant, medical marijuana company Vireo Health.

“In the greater Capital Region, there’s a tremendous amount of human capital,” Vireo CEO Ari Hoffnung said in September. “There’s a lot of talent.

“We want to bring back more (than the 325 jobs) that were lost (at Tryon).”

County officials are also banking on growing agricultural industries statewide.

Since 2000, gross domestic product from upstate New York’s dairy sector has increased by more than 38 percent, to more than $600 million, according to the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth.

In this region alone, international yogurt makers Fage and Chobani have created more than 1,650 jobs, making New York the No. 1 yogurt manufacturing state in the country.

rdownen@timesunion.com • 518-454-5018 • @Robert_Downen

Leader Herald: Lead on new company for Tryon

Fulton County Center for Regional Growth has lead on potential company for new Tryon Technology Park

Lead on potential company: CRG official

June 28, 2016

GLOVERSVILLE – The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth has a good lead on a potential company for the new Tryon Technology Park, an official said.

CRG President and CEO Ron Peters provided scant details at his agency’s board meeting Friday at the CRG office.

When the CRG is pursuing business prospects, few details are made public until the deal is final.

During a report on a “combined county marketing effort,” Peters said the CRG participated in a conference call involving a “qualified lead” for a potential company.

“It went well,” Peters said.

He said the new Tryon Technology Park in Perth may be the proper site if the company wants to move to Fulton County.

Peters also mentioned during the “business marketing inquiries” portion of the meeting that the CRG received a “solid” inquiry through the state. But it was unclear whether he was talking about the same company.

“It could be a regionally significant project,” Peters said.

He said a California company is looking to start up in either Fulton or Montgomery counties.

Peters said the CRG last year participated in about half of 110 economic development conference calls conducted by the state. He said it is a “good system” and the CRG was recently given three proposals by the state identifying “possible leads” for companies.

“There’s work to be done,” Peters said.

He said companies are seeking 250,000 square feet of space with expansion potential. He said companies want buildings with high bays.

“They’re usually looking for existing [facilities], and to retrofit that,” Peters said.

Peters said the CRG has a good handle on its inventory of potential buildings. He said the biggest existing buildings the county has are about 150,000 square feet. He said a lot of companies are looking to move into the New York City market.

Fulton County Industrial Development Agency Executive Director James Mraz said the Tryon park in the towns of Perth and Johnstown will create an opportunity for a business “willing to build.”

“We will now have that place to put them,” Mraz said.

Peters said the current cost for a pre-engineered building is about $80 to $100 per square-foot. He said economic development agencies are receiving “mixed calls” from potential businesses, from Florida up the east coast. He said there are still some “hardcore manufacturers” looking for sites.

Gloversville 3rd Ward Supervisor John Blackmon, county liaison to the CRG, said some buildings of the future may be occupied by only 3D printers.

Michael Anich covers Johnstown and Fulton County news. He can be reached at manich@leaderherald.com

Downtown Gloversville video shows plans for development

This in-depth video shows the 2016 development plan for downtown Gloversville, NY.

CRG set to reopen loan pool for city

April 20, 2016

By JASON SUBIK , Leader Herald 

GLOVERSVILLE – The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth is set to soon reopen a $900,000 loan pool for city businesses.

“That fund has not been active. We’re going to be creating what will be called the Gloversville Loan Fund and we’re setting up a joint administration of that with the city and CRG,” CRG President Ron Peters said.

Peters said the loan pool, which is made up of money from the federal Urban Development Action Grant-funded loan program, had been inactive since at least 2012 when Gloversville initiated two lawsuits against the CRG and its precursor entities, the Fulton County Economic Development Corp. and the Cross Roads Incubator Corp. Gloversville had given the UDAG money to the Fulton County EDC to administer, but sought the return of the funds in the lawsuit.


I think in business, in the real world, you cut your losses and you move forward. We don’t want to be at war with CRG or anybody else. We want to make partnerships. [The New York Innovative Communities Network’s conference] last week wouldn’t have happened if we’re suing each other.” Gloversville Mayor Dayton King


On April 12 the Common Council voted unanimously to drop the lawsuits, forgiving approximately $1.2 million in Gloversville UDAC loans. These were the loans forgiven: $750,000 for the CIC Estee Commons project; $200,000 to the CIC for the construction of 110 Decker Drive, formerly the site of the CRG’s headquarters; $25,000 to Beebie Printing; and a $179,190 loan the city government had borrowed from the fund. Prior to the loan forgiveness, the 110 Decker Drive project had paid down the principle of its loan to $151,854, Beebie Printing had paid down its loan to $13,562, but neither the city nor the Estee Commons project had paid back any portion of its loans.

Mayor Dayton King said he and the Common Council evaluated the likelihood of recovery of any of the forgiven loans and decided it was in the city’s best interest to end the lawsuits.

“We were probably never going to get any of that money back,” King said. “We also realized that if we ever did get that money, it was never going to go back to our general fund. We did get a project out of it, the Estee Commons project, out of that initial grant money. We could have kept beating our heads against the wall and saying no on principle – that was really the theme from the last Common Council, ‘No, no matter what, this is the right thing to do and I don’t want to explain to my taxpayers why we’re forgiving these loans.’ But I think in business, in the real world, you cut your losses and you move forward. We don’t want to be at war with CRG or anybody else. We want to make partnerships. [The New York Innovative Communities Network’s conference] last week wouldn’t have happened if we’re suing each other.”

Peters said at its peak level, the Gloversville UDAG loan fund had approximately $2.2 million in it. As of Jan. 31, the loan fund has $900,000 in it and has three outstanding loans that are receiving monthly payments:

Peters said Gloversville’s decision to forgive the $1.2 million in non-performing loans was crucial to the CRG’s ability to move forward and reopen the UDAG loan fund.

“The issues had to be straightened out,” he said. “We’re going to create a new board – we haven’t had the organizational meeting yet -but we’re going to sit down and organize our new loan committee and it will be made up of the city and the CRG. We’re going to do this in the next week to 10 days.”

King said the new governance board for the Gloversville UDAG fund will include the mayor of Gloversville, three Common Council members and three members from CRG, giving Gloversville elected officials a one-vote majority control of how the money in the fund will be loaned out.

The largest portion of the forgiven money was $750,000 for the Estee Commons project. Peters said the rules of the federal program that governs UDAG loan pools require the UDAG loan to be paid off last for projects that have multiple funding sources. In the case of the Estee Commons project, the project has a $1.9 million private sector mortgage, which is known as the “first position” in the repayment structure.

Peters said Estee Commons, which now has an occupancy rate of between 93 and 100 percent for its 39 apartments, currently brings in about $21,000 per month in rent revenue after expenses, but has about $19,000 in monthly mortgage payments, not counting taxes or insurance. He said at its current rate of payment it won’t repay its private sector mortgage for at least another 15 years.

Peters said the purpose of the Estee Commons project was to help spark urban renewal in the neighborhood in which it was built, but so far the prevailing market rent rates in that neighborhood have not risen to the level necessary to repay both the private and public sector financing for the project. He said rent revenue would need to be about 60 percent higher than it currently is for it to have reasonably repaid its $1.7 million private sector mortgage and the $750,000 from the Gloversville UDAG loan fund.

Until recently, Estee Commons only had about a 60 percent occupancy rate, which Peters attributes to the CRG having only a two-member staff, down from the eight-member staff the Fulton County EDC had at its peak. Peters said the CRG increased the occupancy rate by hiring Schenectady-based property management company Maddalone & Associates, which is paid about 7 percent of the rent revenues for the site.

Peters said Estee Commons was effectively unsellable so long as the $750,000 UDAG loan was still a lien against the value of the property.

“It would be like buying a $20,000 car and saying ‘I know its worth $20,000, but I’m going to give you $40,000 for it,” he said.

King said the low probability of Estee Commons ever selling for a price high enough to repay the UDAG loan was a key part of the city’s decision to drop the lawsuit.

CRG recently relocated its headquarters from 110 Decker Drive, one of the projects which had a loan forgiven, to the former OHM Laboratories building at 34 W. Fulton St. in Gloversville, a 35,000 square foot location the CRG plans to use as a business incubator.

King said there was never an explicit quid pro quo agreement for Gloversville to forgive the Decker Drive loan and the CRG to move to downtown Gloversville, but he’s glad the organization made the move.

Urban Council zeroes in on downtown Gloversville

downtown gloversville BID

Downtown Gloversville

Downtown Gloversville will be the setting for the quarterly meeting of the NYS Urban Council, a group that facilitates and encourages revitalization and development of central business districts in cities, towns and villages across New York State.

The conference: “Gloversville – Downtowns with a Future – The Making of Places,” will run Thursday, April 14 at 8:30 a.m. to noon on Friday, April 15 at various downtown buildings within walking distance, starting at the NBT Bank Building at 12 North Main Street
Gloversville.

Formed in 1991, the NYS Urban Council gets assistance from the Empire State Development Corporation as it brings together “downtown practitioners” and economic development professionals to share ideas about breathing life into business districts,

The regional meeting in Gloversville is a chance to convene professionals to work together to identify solutions for common issues faced in our communities and business districts.   A peer-based resource, the Council tracks innovative programs and communities, in hopes of being a go-to resource for New York business districts.  This regional meeting is open to downtown and Main Street professionals, their respective board members and businesses and the like to come learn in this “live” learning laboratory.   The planned “Live Learning Laboratory” program will be fast-paced, with peer-to-peer exchanges, lively speakers, peer professional social opportunities and best (and not-so-good) practice examples.

Holiday Inn Gloversville/Johnstown

Holiday Inn Johnstown/Gloversville

Organizers are putting together an informal gathering opportunity for those who plan to arrive the night before on April 13. Contact the local hosts, Vince DeSantis of the City of Gloversville, vdesantis48@icloud.com or Ron Peters, Fulton County Center for Regional Growth 518-725-7700.

Tickets are $75 for the full conference or $25 for the Thursday night dinner and presentation only. Tickets may be purchased online here (with an added EventBrite handling fee.)

The Holiday Inn Johnstown/Gloversville is offering a $90 room rate  April 13 -15 for participants who mention NYS Urban Council/INNCOM (308 N Comrie Ave, Johnstown, NY 12095 (518) 762-4686).

 

Program at a Glance

Thursday, April 14, 2016

8:30 a.m. Registration Open with Complimentary Breakfast at former City National Bank building 12 N Main St, Gloversville, NY 12078 

9:15 a.m. Welcoming Remarks 

9:45 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Break Out Sessions

Workshop Option A — “Raising the Quality of Life for Living in your Downtown with Crime Prevention” at the former City National Bank / NBT Bank Building 12 N Main St, Gloversville, NY 12078


Topics include -

  • Community Policing and Crime Prevention in your Downtown
  • Panel: Neighborhood police programs. The first line of economic development in your downtown is dealing with perception and the safety of your center city.

Workshop Option B — “The Making of a Place is all about Messaging”

  • Panel: Marketing, special events, outreach. What are the tools to building a vibrant life in town? Experts in downtown programming and marketing will speak of the tools and techniques they use to affect positive messaging and create a sense of place in their communities.
glove marquee

The Glove Theatre


12:00 p.m.
 Luncheon at The Glove Performing Arts Center, 42 N Main St, Gloversville
During lunch, the Committee for Gloversville’s Downtown will give a status update and ask members of the local business community, participants and downtown practitioners from across the state to share ideas to help shape the host community’s plans for the future.

1:45 p.m. Afternoon Sessions

Workshop C — “Innovative Programming for your Community”

  • What others are doing to fill the gap or at least encourage the gap be filled; pop-up retail, food trucks, place-making, alternative energy, car sharing, bike sharing, incentives, office to residential conversions 

Workshop D — “Chamber Rotunda-Camp Fire Session”

  • Sit around the campfire (indoors) and discuss the challenges of bringing a “Creative Class” sector to life in your community. Discuss with your peers what they are doing in their communities to bring about change in food, the arts, creativity in development, technology and education into the heart of town.  

3:15 p.m. Walking Tour of Downtown followed by tour of Schine Memorial Hall - Meet at Chamber Building.

 

5:00 p.m. Reception and Dinner at the Eccentric Club

  • cocktails cash bar, followed by a buffet dinner.  
Cooperative Market in downtown Gloversville.

Mohawk Harvest Cooperative Market in downtown Gloversville

Friday, April 15, 2016

8:15 to 9:45 a.m. Urban Council Board Meeting (for Urban Council Board Members)

9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Non Board Members meet for breakfast at Mohawk Harvest Cooperative

Morning Program

  • Statewide & Region-by-Region Coffee Chat

Conference speakers, panel details and requests:

Anthony Capece Albany Central BID: 518-462-4300

International site selectors find out about Tryon site

Fulton County Center for Regional Growth CEO Ronald Peters has returned from a meeting in Tennessee with site selectors from across the country where he promoted the opportunities available at Tryon Technology Park.

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan  FCCRG President Ron Peters

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan
FCCRG President Ron Peters

The Site Selectors Guild’s Annual Conference held in Nashville from Wednesday to Friday was a prime networking opportunity for FCCRG and Peters. Getting the Tryon Technology Park on the radar of so many influential consultants means that information about the site will be communicated to corporations across the world.

Peters said delivered brochures, as well as the message that New York state is “embracing” businesses that wish to come here. He also met again with Michael Mullis, a site selector who visited Fulton County in 2013 and has had positive things to say about the potential of the Tryon site.

FCCRG’s Peters said he’s trying to arrange a tour of Tryon for other members of the Site Selectors Guild. “They have a forum and potentially could come back,” he said. “The word’s getting out there.”

The 500-acre site, mostly in the Town of Perth, is owned by the Fulton County Industrial Development Agency. Fulton County is assisting in development and FCCRG is marketing the project. The flagship tenant, Vireo Health of New York LLC, began production at the site this summer of pharmaceutical cannabis under a special license from New York State.

Peters also plans to attend the next forum of the Industrial Asset Management Council from March 12 through 16 in New Orleans.