Gloversville microbrewery takes shape 

Microbrewery to open in Gloversville: From left, Matt Sherman, Nick Sherman and Casey Oare, the brains and muscle behind Stump City Brewing. PHOTOGRAPHER: DANIEL FITZSIMMONS

Microbrewery to open in Gloversville: From left, Matt Sherman, Nick Sherman and Casey Oare, the brains and muscle behind Stump City Brewing. PHOTOGRAPHER: DANIEL FITZSIMMONS

Originally published in The Daily Gazette

By Daniel Fitzsimmons, December 18, 2016

For brothers Matt and Nick Sherman, along with their childhood friend, Casey Oare, nearly every weekend for the past three years has been spent building a shared dream conceived nearly six years ago in the Shermans’ garage: to open a brewery together that Gloversville could call its own.

Standing in the now-functioning brewery and taproom recently, which lacked only the finishing touches, the trio — and Stump City Brewing — have come a long way from the garage where they experimented with different homebrew recipes and fantasized about doing something bigger.

“Our motto is ‘from the ground up,’” said Matt Sherman, 34, a reference to the do it yourself-ethos that informs nearly everything they do, from building the structure that houses the brewery and taproom themselves to slogging through the mountains of state and federal paperwork required to operate a brewery.

The other defining feature of Stump City Brewing is their devotion to Gloversville and the surrounding area, and their drive to source everything — from the ingredients in their beer to construction materials — locally.

The bar in the taproom is made from the trees that were cleared to make way for their building. The ceiling is lined with corrugated sheet metal, giving it a rustic look, that a friend had stockpiled and given them. The plank floor is made of reclaimed wood from a nearby house that was gutted.

The project took three years’ worth of weekends because all three men have day jobs. Matt Sherman is a school counselor, Nick Sherman sells bus parts, and Oare is a paramedic and firefighter. Weekends were all spent bringing the dream to life.

Stump City is also taking advantage of New York’s farm brewing law, which provides incentives like decreased permitting requirements to New York-based brewers in exchange for the brewers sourcing a portion of their ingredients inside the state. The purpose of the law is to spur hop and grain production in the state and increase demand for local products.

Under the farm brewery law, at least 20 percent of the brewery’s hops must come from inside the state, and 20 percent of all other ingredients must be native to New York. Those ratios increase to 90 percent each in 2024.

But the Shermans and Oare are already there, sourcing 90 percent of their grain bill from a farm outside Rochester, and all of their hops — for now — from Goddard Tree Farm in Johnstown. Nick Sherman, 30, said there’s a need for increased hop and grain production in the state, which is ideal for growing such crops.

“It’s just a matter of convincing these farmers that there’s money to be made in growing those crops,” said Nick Sherman. “The startup costs are high.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, their name is local too. Before the area was called Gloversville it was known as “Stump City,” after all the trees that had been cut down to supply bark for the leather tanning process.

The brewery is located on West Fulton Street extension, behind the Sherman family home on land donated by the Shermans’ dad, Jerry Sherman, who is also a partner in the brewery and provided funds to help get the project off the ground.

“We grew up playing in these woods,” said Nick Sherman, looking out the back door of the brewery.

About $13,000 in additional funds was raised through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, which Matt Sherman said was crucial to the finishing of the brewery.
“Without the Indiegogo this wouldn’t have happened,” he said, noting that contributors, depending on how much they donated, will receive perks like Stump City clothing and gear or even the chance to brew an original beer.

And while other crowdfunding campaigns might draw donations from around the world, virtually all of the donations made to Stump City were from friends, relatives and others within the group’s orbit.

“I don’t think there’s one donor we don’t know,” said Matt Sherman. “The support in the community has been huge.”

“We all grew up here,” said Casey Oare, 31. “And for the people who stayed there’s a certain amount of pride being from the area, and we want to be a part of that.”

The group’s goal is to sell beer in their taproom and at local beverage centers where people can fill up their growlers — large, reusable glass containers used to store beer for personal use — with Stump City beer. Eventually they’d like for the brewery to support one of them as a full-time employee, and from there start increasing capacity, which currently stands at around 31 gallons per batch.

They currently have three brews that will be in regular rotation at the taproom; their Cayadutta Cream Ale, which they said is a good entry point to craft beer, a pale ale and a red ale.

Oare said there’s lots of buzz around when the taproom will open, and that he gets questioned by local residents on when they’ll be able to come in for a beer.
“Everybody wants to know when we’re opening,” Oare said.

The group said they want to do a soft opening for family, friends and supporters in the coming weeks, and open the taproom to the general public in the spring.
But they’re in no rush. The Shermans and Oare take a lot of pride in the beer they make, their local roots, and building something that those in Gloversville and the surrounding area can take a measure of ownership in.

“We want to make people proud,” said Matt Sherman. “We want people to be able to say, ‘that’s my beer.’”

Fulton County working to rebuild local economy: Times Union

Officials market low costs, infrastructure to attract companies, people

 By Robert Downen, Originally published in the Albany Times Union

In their quest to reverse economic downturn, Fulton County officials are focusing on three words: Live, work and play.

By 2026, they hope their county will attract residents who want to do all three.

Once the epicenter of the upstate leather industry centered in Gloversville, Fulton County has steadily watched economic opportunities dwindle as niche manufacturing jobs go overseas.

Since 1970, the number of people directly and indirectly employed in the leather trades has dropped from 10,000 to 400, the U.S. Department of Labor said.

“These businesses employed towns,” Johnny Evers, director of government affairs at the Business Council of New York State, said at a seminar on Fulton County economic development Tuesday,

Now — and hopefully, with buy-in from local business leaders and elected officials — county officials are hoping they can transform the area into a hotbed of growth by attracting businesses and young people alike.

Boosters believe they have the resources both in infrastructure and human capital. The question is how to get people to use them.

The pitch is simple: Cheap cost of living, coupled with the factory buildings left over from the heyday of manufacturing, should make Fulton County immediately attractive to those seeking metropolitan amenities at a discounted rate.

“Upstate New York is a beautiful place to explore and enjoy, but in many areas the cost of living can be too high,” Jim Mraz, Fulton County planning director, said in August. “In Fulton County, that’s not the case, and that’s something we’re proud of.”

Add in a low crime rate, a new focus on regional partnerships and the county’s location in the middle of myriad nature destinations, and officials are confident they “can establish Fulton County as one of the Capital Region’s premier economic and residential destinations,” said Charles Potter, chairman of the Fulton County Board of Supervisors.

Since undertaking the development initiative called Jump Start Fulton County in 2014, officials have focused heavily on luring new businesses and young workers to shovel-ready sites.

Fulton and Montgomery counties at that time brought in Mike Mullis, a corporate site selector, to assess the region’s ability to attract large corporations. Mullis identified seven clusters on which the counties should focus, with biomedical research and development, food and beverage services and health care products among them.

By reorienting towards such high-tech sectors, officials hope they can use their location in the middle of what they’re calling the “Tech Triangle” of New York as a selling point. (Both Utica and the Capital Region tout significant biotechnology sectors, and Albany was rated last week as the most friendly place to do business in New York by Forbes).

A cornerstone of that strategy is the Tryon Technology Park in Perth. The 515-acre park, once occupied by the now-shuttered Tryon Detention Center, has been the focus of the Fulton County Industrial Development Agency. Last year it moved in its first tenant, medical marijuana company Vireo Health.

“In the greater Capital Region, there’s a tremendous amount of human capital,” Vireo CEO Ari Hoffnung said in September. “There’s a lot of talent.

“We want to bring back more (than the 325 jobs) that were lost (at Tryon).”

County officials are also banking on growing agricultural industries statewide.

Since 2000, gross domestic product from upstate New York’s dairy sector has increased by more than 38 percent, to more than $600 million, according to the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth.

In this region alone, international yogurt makers Fage and Chobani have created more than 1,650 jobs, making New York the No. 1 yogurt manufacturing state in the country.

rdownen@timesunion.com • 518-454-5018 • @Robert_Downen

Agenda set for export seminar

Export seminar sponsored by the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth and TD Bank
td-bank-logoFCCRGlogoCMYK

Growth Strategies:
Expanding Your Business Internationally

Holiday Inn Johnstown-Gloversville
November 15, 2016

This export seminar includes networking and learning opportunities about potential markets, logistics, available export financing and cutting through red tape while establishing new lines of business between Fulton County, New York, and the world.

8:30 a.m.
Networking and Registration (Continental Breakfast)

9:00 a.m.
Welcome 

  • Ronald Peters, President & CEO, Fulton County Center for Regional Growth
  • Robert Davey, Regional Vice President for Upstate NY, TD Bank

9:10
Managing Payments and Finalizing the Sale

  • Strategies and options for sending and receiving money from overseas – Maria Aldrete, Director of Foreign Exchange Services, TD Securities LLC
  • Strategies for boosting international sales, managing risk and structuring transactions that benefit both buyers and sellers - Andrea Ratay, Vice President, Global Trade Finance, TD Bank

10:00 a.m.
Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management: Discussion with Moderator

  • Supply Chain management: How to move your products internationally with efficiency and strategies to address some of the challenges facing companies – Tom Valentine, Vice President of Sales & Marketing, Mainfreight USA and Carl Erickson, Director of Supply Chain, Plug Power Inc.

10:30 a.m.
Getting Ready to Export: Federal & State Assistance

  • Export Assistance from the federal government- Toni Corsini, NY/NJ Regional Manager, Office of International Trade, U.S. Small Business Administration
  • Export Assistance from the state governmentEdward Kowalewski, Director of International Investment Programs & Private Sector Liaison to the World Bank,  Empire State Development

11:00 a.m.
Legal Environment of Exporting/Importing:

  • How to protect your intellectual property and what to be mindful of from a legal perspective David Miranda, Attorney, Heslin, Rothenberg, Farley & Mesiti P.C.

11:30 a.m.
Break and Networking

12:00 p.m.
Lunch

12:30 p.m.
Special Guest Speaker 

  • Current state of U.S. and Global Economic Landscape – Implications for importers and  exporters– Brittany Baumann, Economist & Macro Strategist, TD Securities LLC

1:00  p.m. Final Words

  • Cedric Carter, Vice President & Senior Relationship Manager, TD Bank

                                                                               fc-positivefultonmontgomeryconnectedforbusinesslogo

Export symposium planned in Fulton County NY

The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth has begun preliminary work on organizing a fall symposium in Fulton County to help local businesses take advantage of opportunities for selling their products in foreign markets.

Townsend Leather Design showroom in Fulton County NY

Custom leather manufacturer Townsend Leather gained the Mohawk Valley’s sole Foreign Trade Zone designation this year at its Fulton County, NY, production facility. The FCCRG is planning an export symposium in the fall to help local businesses take advantage of foreign trade opportunities.

The export symposium will focus not only on encouraging small and large local companies to expand their sales markets, but also on demonstrating international trade opportunities to companies that may be interested in settling in Fulton County.

With initial sponsorship and participation by Empire State Development’s Global NY initiative and at least one Capital Region bank, CRG President Ron Peters is planning a one day symposium in the first half of October. Global NY is an initiative launched by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo to offer “one-stop shopping to both foreign businesses looking to invest in New York and to local businesses who want to export globally.”

The event will focus on understanding and accessing available financing and loan packages, cutting through red tape and making connections. Peters said he also plans to approach Montgomery County economic development officials about participating in the event, with the goal of having representatives from at least 30 businesses involved.

Fulton County is ideally situated for the production and transportation of goods bound for international markets. Three interstate highways provide quick and direct access to New York City, Montreal, Boston and Philadelphia, as well as the deep-water Port of Albany and Albany International Airport. In fact, there are 21 international airports within a four-hour drive of Fulton County.

Fulton County is also part of Foreign-Trade Zone #121, which allows individual businesses to apply to have their facilities designated as international commerce zones. In these federally approved areas (industrial parks or individual manufacturing or distribution facilities) materials can be imported without the payment of U.S. Customs duties as long as the goods stay in the FTZ.  Once the goods leave the FTZ for U.S. consumption, reduced tariffs are available. FTZ sites remain within the jurisdiction of local and state governments, but are subject to spot checks and periodic inspections by Customs.

In March 2016, Townsend Leather became the first Fulton County company to receive Foreign Trade Zone status from the U.S. Department of Commerce since a former eyeglass manufacturer achieved FTZ status in 1996. Townsend’s FTZ designation – the only one currently active in the Mohawk Valley – allows the custom leather manufacturer to avoid paying tariffs before shipping in raw leather and chemicals from outside the U.S. to its Townsend Avenue plant, as well as take advantage of reduced levies on custom leathers it sells in the United States using materials sourced overseas.

Townsend employs more than 140 people in Fulton County to create high-quality and custom leathers for aviation, hospitality, residential, yachting and other specialty-end uses.

Corporate site selector Michael Mullis of JM Mullis, Inc. has called the Fulton Montgomery Region a prime area for businesses looking for a New York location because of the transportation infrastructure and availability of shovel-ready sites and natural resources.

Specific dates, locations and seminars for the symposium will be available as they are finalized at FCCRG.org.

 

 

Leader Herald: Lead on new company for Tryon

Fulton County Center for Regional Growth has lead on potential company for new Tryon Technology Park

Lead on potential company: CRG official

June 28, 2016

GLOVERSVILLE – The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth has a good lead on a potential company for the new Tryon Technology Park, an official said.

CRG President and CEO Ron Peters provided scant details at his agency’s board meeting Friday at the CRG office.

When the CRG is pursuing business prospects, few details are made public until the deal is final.

During a report on a “combined county marketing effort,” Peters said the CRG participated in a conference call involving a “qualified lead” for a potential company.

“It went well,” Peters said.

He said the new Tryon Technology Park in Perth may be the proper site if the company wants to move to Fulton County.

Peters also mentioned during the “business marketing inquiries” portion of the meeting that the CRG received a “solid” inquiry through the state. But it was unclear whether he was talking about the same company.

“It could be a regionally significant project,” Peters said.

He said a California company is looking to start up in either Fulton or Montgomery counties.

Peters said the CRG last year participated in about half of 110 economic development conference calls conducted by the state. He said it is a “good system” and the CRG was recently given three proposals by the state identifying “possible leads” for companies.

“There’s work to be done,” Peters said.

He said companies are seeking 250,000 square feet of space with expansion potential. He said companies want buildings with high bays.

“They’re usually looking for existing [facilities], and to retrofit that,” Peters said.

Peters said the CRG has a good handle on its inventory of potential buildings. He said the biggest existing buildings the county has are about 150,000 square feet. He said a lot of companies are looking to move into the New York City market.

Fulton County Industrial Development Agency Executive Director James Mraz said the Tryon park in the towns of Perth and Johnstown will create an opportunity for a business “willing to build.”

“We will now have that place to put them,” Mraz said.

Peters said the current cost for a pre-engineered building is about $80 to $100 per square-foot. He said economic development agencies are receiving “mixed calls” from potential businesses, from Florida up the east coast. He said there are still some “hardcore manufacturers” looking for sites.

Gloversville 3rd Ward Supervisor John Blackmon, county liaison to the CRG, said some buildings of the future may be occupied by only 3D printers.

Michael Anich covers Johnstown and Fulton County news. He can be reached at manich@leaderherald.com

Downtown Gloversville video shows plans for development

This in-depth video shows the 2016 development plan for downtown Gloversville, NY.

Urban Council zeroes in on downtown Gloversville

downtown gloversville BID

Downtown Gloversville

Downtown Gloversville will be the setting for the quarterly meeting of the NYS Urban Council, a group that facilitates and encourages revitalization and development of central business districts in cities, towns and villages across New York State.

The conference: “Gloversville – Downtowns with a Future – The Making of Places,” will run Thursday, April 14 at 8:30 a.m. to noon on Friday, April 15 at various downtown buildings within walking distance, starting at the NBT Bank Building at 12 North Main Street
Gloversville.

Formed in 1991, the NYS Urban Council gets assistance from the Empire State Development Corporation as it brings together “downtown practitioners” and economic development professionals to share ideas about breathing life into business districts,

The regional meeting in Gloversville is a chance to convene professionals to work together to identify solutions for common issues faced in our communities and business districts.   A peer-based resource, the Council tracks innovative programs and communities, in hopes of being a go-to resource for New York business districts.  This regional meeting is open to downtown and Main Street professionals, their respective board members and businesses and the like to come learn in this “live” learning laboratory.   The planned “Live Learning Laboratory” program will be fast-paced, with peer-to-peer exchanges, lively speakers, peer professional social opportunities and best (and not-so-good) practice examples.

Holiday Inn Gloversville/Johnstown

Holiday Inn Johnstown/Gloversville

Organizers are putting together an informal gathering opportunity for those who plan to arrive the night before on April 13. Contact the local hosts, Vince DeSantis of the City of Gloversville, vdesantis48@icloud.com or Ron Peters, Fulton County Center for Regional Growth 518-725-7700.

Tickets are $75 for the full conference or $25 for the Thursday night dinner and presentation only. Tickets may be purchased online here (with an added EventBrite handling fee.)

The Holiday Inn Johnstown/Gloversville is offering a $90 room rate  April 13 -15 for participants who mention NYS Urban Council/INNCOM (308 N Comrie Ave, Johnstown, NY 12095 (518) 762-4686).

 

Program at a Glance

Thursday, April 14, 2016

8:30 a.m. Registration Open with Complimentary Breakfast at former City National Bank building 12 N Main St, Gloversville, NY 12078 

9:15 a.m. Welcoming Remarks 

9:45 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Break Out Sessions

Workshop Option A — “Raising the Quality of Life for Living in your Downtown with Crime Prevention” at the former City National Bank / NBT Bank Building 12 N Main St, Gloversville, NY 12078


Topics include -

  • Community Policing and Crime Prevention in your Downtown
  • Panel: Neighborhood police programs. The first line of economic development in your downtown is dealing with perception and the safety of your center city.

Workshop Option B — “The Making of a Place is all about Messaging”

  • Panel: Marketing, special events, outreach. What are the tools to building a vibrant life in town? Experts in downtown programming and marketing will speak of the tools and techniques they use to affect positive messaging and create a sense of place in their communities.
glove marquee

The Glove Theatre


12:00 p.m.
 Luncheon at The Glove Performing Arts Center, 42 N Main St, Gloversville
During lunch, the Committee for Gloversville’s Downtown will give a status update and ask members of the local business community, participants and downtown practitioners from across the state to share ideas to help shape the host community’s plans for the future.

1:45 p.m. Afternoon Sessions

Workshop C — “Innovative Programming for your Community”

  • What others are doing to fill the gap or at least encourage the gap be filled; pop-up retail, food trucks, place-making, alternative energy, car sharing, bike sharing, incentives, office to residential conversions 

Workshop D — “Chamber Rotunda-Camp Fire Session”

  • Sit around the campfire (indoors) and discuss the challenges of bringing a “Creative Class” sector to life in your community. Discuss with your peers what they are doing in their communities to bring about change in food, the arts, creativity in development, technology and education into the heart of town.  

3:15 p.m. Walking Tour of Downtown followed by tour of Schine Memorial Hall - Meet at Chamber Building.

 

5:00 p.m. Reception and Dinner at the Eccentric Club

  • cocktails cash bar, followed by a buffet dinner.  
Cooperative Market in downtown Gloversville.

Mohawk Harvest Cooperative Market in downtown Gloversville

Friday, April 15, 2016

8:15 to 9:45 a.m. Urban Council Board Meeting (for Urban Council Board Members)

9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Non Board Members meet for breakfast at Mohawk Harvest Cooperative

Morning Program

  • Statewide & Region-by-Region Coffee Chat

Conference speakers, panel details and requests:

Anthony Capece Albany Central BID: 518-462-4300

100 years of great businesses in Fulton County

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan  The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth's free networking event entitled "Business Jubilee" celebrated Fulton County businesses that have been in business for 50 years or more.

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan
The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth’s free networking event entitled “Business Jubilee” celebrated Fulton County businesses that have been in business for 50 years or more.

Fulton County Center for Regional growth celebrated the “deep roots, strong hearts and unbridled optimism” of the county’s most venerable businesses at a Business Jubilee in November.

With generous support from community sponsors, the FCCRG highlighted and honored 29 businesses and organizations that have operated in Fulton County for 50 years or more.

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan  Jack Scott of WENT radio speaks during the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth's "Business Jubilee."

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan
Jack Scott of WENT radio speaks during the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth’s “Business Jubilee.”

Jack Scott of WENT Radio, noted: “The businesses represented here tonight have survived and thrived. And only the strong survive.”

Scott described the common threads all the businesses share: strength of character, the ability to adapt, dedication, optimism, resilience, a commitment to serve their markets with outstanding products and customer service.

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan  FCCRG President Ron Peters

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan
FCCRG President Ron Peters

About 150 people attended the networking event, which was a part of an ongoing effort by the CRG to show the advantages Fulton County has fostered for more than a century to entrepreneurs looking for places to settle and expand. At the same time, the event supported and encouraged the growth and strength of existing businesses.

“It’s about working together – 2016 is the year of cooperation and collaboration,” CRG President Ron Peters said.

The CRG had a poster made describing the history of each honoree business. To order a commemorative booklet of all of the posters from the event, please contact Becky either by phone or email (518-725-7700 or beckyh@fccrg.org).

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan  Jeannie Moller, left, and her daughter Amie Waddle, both of Caroga, look at a display which features Bowman's Market in Gloversville during the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth's free networking event entitled "Business Jubilee."

The Leader-Herald/Bill Trojan
Jeannie Moller, left, and her daughter Amie Waddle, both of Caroga, look at a display which features Bowman’s Market in Gloversville during the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth’s “Business Jubilee.”

77 years: Bowman’s Market, 50 East Pine Street, Gloversville
54 years: Brown’s Ford, 121 North Comrie Avenue, Johnstown
64 years: Capano’s Barber Shop, 27 West Fulton Street, Gloversville
100 years: Century Linen & Uniform, 335 North Main Street, Gloversville
161 years: Cherry Valley Memorials, 141 South Main Street, Gloversville
59 years: Coldwell Banker Realty, 363 North Comrie Avenue, Johnstown
51 years: Derby Office Equipment, 25 North Arlington Ave., Gloversville
136 years: Frontier Communications, 137 Harrison Street Gloversville
51 years: Fulton County Board of Realtors, 32 Spring Street, Gloversville
123 years: Fulton County YMCA, 213 Harrison Street, Gloversville
96 years: Fulton Montgomery Chamber of Commerce, 2 North Main Street, Gloversville
76 years: Glove Cities Veterinary Hospital, 35 Harrison Street, Gloversville
101 years: Glove Theatre, 42 North Main Street, Gloversville
135 years: Gloversville Public Library, 58 East Fulton Street, Gloversville
125 years: Gloversville Sewing Center, 50 East Pine Street, Gloversville
62 years: Lexington ARC, 127 East State Street, Gloversville
81 years: Lohse Florist, 93 East State Street, Gloversville
97 years: Main Motorcar, 224 West Main Street, Johnstown
90 years: Mr. G’s Hair Gallery, 55 West Fulton Street, Gloversville
79 years: New York Lunch, 21 Bleecker Street, Gloversville
57 years: Robert M. Halgas Funeral Home, 111 County Highway 140, Johnstown
93 years: Rossbach Shoe, 10 West Fulton Street, Gloversville
66 years: Ruby & Quiri, 307 North Comrie Avenue, Johnstown
202 years: Saltsman’s Hotel, 104 County Highway 140, Fort Plain
107 years: Taylor Made Group, 66 Kingsboro Avenue, Gloversville
128 years: The Leader Herald, 8 East Fulton Street, Gloversville
71 years: WENT Radio, 138 Harrison Street Ext., Gloversville
75 years: WEST & Company, 97 North Main Street, Gloversville
107 years: Willing Helpers Home for Women, 226 West Madison Avenue, Johnstown

“I’m surprised by the amount of people who came out. It’s positive and uplifting,” said Richard Smith, owner of Century Linen and Uniform Service. The business – until this year known as Robison & Smith – has been operating in Fulton County for 100 years.

“It’s really good to showcase hometown businesses, to look at what they’re doing right,” Gloversville 5th Ward Supervisor Greg Young said.

The CRG is grateful for the generous support of the following businesses who made this event possible to be free and open to the public.

  • Century Sponsor: The Leader Herald
  • Golden Age Sponsor: Patriot Federal Bank
  • Jubilee Sponsors: Lexington, Fulton County Chapter, NYSARC Inc.;
  • West & Company; Nathan Littauer Hospital and Nursing Home; Frontier Communications
  • Sweets Sponsor: Fulton County Board of Realtors
  • Carving Station Sponsors: Ruby & Quiri; Wells Fargo Advisors

Fulton BoardofRealtors logoR&Q logows_logo WEST-Logo
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2 color lexington logo

Official Logo Black and White, NLHFrontier

24X40 Logo Patriot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See local newspaper coverage By MORGAN FRISCH in The Leader Herald    

Calling Fulton County Businesses Over 50

Fulton County is a great place to live and do business. The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth is celebrating a cross section of its community that has shown loyalty and commitment for 50 or more years.

If you are one of these special Fulton County businesses, please let us know by sharing your story with us in this online form. We’ll make a display of your accomplishments at

The Fulton County Business Jubilee
Friday, November 13, 2015
Holiday Inn, Johnstown at 6:00 p.m.

Main Motorcar

The Business Jubilee will celebrate businesses with 50 or more years of commitment to Fulton County, NY.

This event is free and open to the public thanks to the support of a growing cadre of generous sponsors. We do need an RSVP from those who will be attending by November 9, 2015, via email or by calling  518-725-7700 Ext. 100.

The evening will feature a presentation by CRG President and CEO Ronald Peters and select business owners. Guests will be treated to an array of hors d’oeuvres and food stations courtesy of event sponsors. Additional sponsorship opportunities are still available.

WAMC: Fulton County Officials Hope Medical Marijuana Will Jumpstart Tryon Site

Fulton County Officials Hope Medical Marijuana Will Jumpstart Tryon Site

Originally Broadcast on WAMC NorthEast Public Radio

By LUCAS WILLARD

Listen to the report on WAMC’s Website

The economy of rural Fulton County, New York has struggled for years, but with a new medical marijuana cultivation center on the way, officials are hoping New York’s burgeoning biomedical industry will help draw new business to the region.

 On the last day of July, five of 43 applicants were awarded licenses by the New York State Department of Health to cultivate, process, and distribute medical marijuana. Company Empire State Health Solutions is working to begin distributing the drug from its Fulton County facility.

Chief Operating Officer Michael Newel told WAMC that the site in the Mohawk Valley was chosen for its central location and proximity to major roadways.

 “Having grown up in Galway and Amsterdam, I was well aware of the unemployment rate in Fulton and Montgomery County and starting thinking that was pretty centrally located and was there a place where we could site the facility there. And as I started looking at that the Tryon Technology Park popped up.”

 The Tryon Technology Park was converted from a state operated juvenile correctional facility. Empire State Development transferred the property to the Fulton County Industrial Development Agency in 2012.

 Jim Mraz, Executive Director of IDA and Fulton County Planner, is excited for the Perth facility’s first tenant.

“We’re hoping this is the start of something big and will be something great for this region if we can replace all of the jobs that were lost when that facility closed,” said Mraz.

 At its peak, the Tryon Residential Center employed 350 before closing. Empire State Health Solutions anticipates creating at least 75 full-time jobs.

 While electric, gas, water, sewer, and fiber-optic internet were already available at the site, over the last year the county and IDA have made a few improvements including a new access road and rerouted sewer and water lines.

 Mraz said Fulton County commissioned a study for the best industrial uses at the Tryon site.

 “And the number one cluster is bio-medical research and development. Empire State Health Solutions proposed pharmaceutical manufacturing facility is a perfect fit.”

 And officials hope the company will jumpstart the 500-acre Tryon site and bring in more tenants. Ron Peters is President and CEO of the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth.

 “By bringing in this group we can go out and try to attract other similar bio-med groups. I think it’s going to change the landscape of Tryon Technology Park,” said Peters.

 Peters also praised the site’s rural setting and central location.

 “Close proximity to Saratoga, very close proximity to Albany, and its close proximity to all sites north and west.”

 Empire State Health Solutions will distribute medical marijuana to Broome, Albany, Westchester and Queens counties.

 Elsewhere in our region, Etain LLC will manufacture in Warren County and dispense in Albany, Ulster, Westchester, and Onondaga counties. PharmaCann will operate out of Orange County and distribute the in the Bronx, Erie, Onondaga and Albany counties.

 Columbia Care NY will dispense the drug in Clinton County.

 For a full list of companies and locations visit: http://www.health.ny.gov/regulations/medical_marijuana/application/selected_applicants.htm