National Expert Visits Downtown Gloversville

People celebrating at events in downtown Gloversville.

People celebrating at events in downtown Gloversville.

On October 27, 2017, CRG hosted Andrew Manshel for a presentation and discussion on downtown revitalization and placemaking efforts in Gloversville. Mr. Manshel is a nationally recognized expert in both economic development and placemaking, having served as the Executive Vice President of Greater Jamaica Development Corporation, Associate Director and Counsel at the Bryant Park Restoration Corporation, General Counsel and Director of Public Amenities to the Grand Central and 34th Street Partnerships, among other roles. Currently, Mr. Manshel serves as the principal of Place Master Projects Advisory Services and is a Director and Treasurer of Project for Public Spaces, Inc.

During his presentation, Mr. Manshel discussed the notion that no place is unique, therefore the options to iterate successful projects from other cities is endless. The key to sustainable economic development has been shown not to occur through incentivizing projects but by creating places where people want to be, with sustainable economic development following the people.

How do you make downtown Gloversville a place where people want to be? By having constant downtown programming. Programming can come in small and large forms, from offering tables and chairs with chess sets to major downtown events such as the Twilight Market or Southern Adirondack Wine & Food Festival.

To learn more about Andrew Manshel, please visit his Place Master website here.

Mr. Manshel’s full presentation is available here: Manshel_Gloversville Oct 2017.

Would you like to learn more about how Gloversville is working toward a sustainable economic revitalization? Please contact Jennifer Jennings, Downtown Development Specialist at jenniferj@fccrg.org or call her at 518.725.7700 ext. 107.

 

CRG talks could lead to more Fulton County jobs

One local manufacturer could add 50 new Fulton County jobs

Insight into CRG operations was part of the agency’s monthly activities report given last week to the Fulton County supervisors.

CRG President and CEO Ronald Peters said the CRG received an inquiry from a “potential start-up” knitting operation located in the New York City area.

He said Tuesday he hasn’t heard back from the company and he’s not sure where it will settle.

Peters also alluded to other recent CRG business marketing efforts. He said the agency is working with an unidentified “local manufacturer” that created 10 new jobs last month and wants to expand further. He said he brought in a state Economic Development Corp. representative to start exploring an opportunity for the state to offer a financing package to the county.

“I’m still working with the state on that package,” Peters said.

He said there is a possibility this could be a “regionally-significant project” with 50 or more jobs.

Peters reported he met with a former small local manufacturer about potentially starting up again.

He said the CRG also received an out-of-state inquiry that was passed on to an unnamed local manufacturer.

The CRG worked with an engineering firm and submitted a $300,000 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant application for the city of Gloversville.

Peters said he met with Northville Mayor John Spaeth, Northampton Supervisor James Groff and a potential Main Street Program applicant about a possible project in Northville.

The CRG’s 2013-15 Microenterprise Grant generated 19 jobs among small businesses in the county, Peters said. The state has granted the CRG an extension to the end of 2017 so approved applicants can complete job requirements.

Peters said the 2016 Microenterprise Grant program recently gave out its first grant to Gloversville-based Frozen Parts Inc. The company fabricates and assembles more than 500 of the most asked-for parts, its website says.

The CRG’s County Loan Pool still has several applications out in various stages, Peters said. He said he recently met with more potential applicants.

Peters said the CRG continues to work with Saratoga Springs-based marketing agency Shannon Rose, which updates the CRG website. The firm is also managing the CRG’s Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Working with the county’s lead-generating firm, Peters said the CRG made “several” calls to companies explaining the benefits of locating in Fulton County.

The CRG also participated in a similar Qualified Lead Generating Initiative with New York state. Peters said the CRG had three conference calls with a company looking at potentially moving to the state.

Michael Anich covers Johnstown and Fulton County news. He can be reached at manich@leaderherald.com.

Gloversville microbrewery takes shape 

Microbrewery to open in Gloversville: From left, Matt Sherman, Nick Sherman and Casey Oare, the brains and muscle behind Stump City Brewing. PHOTOGRAPHER: DANIEL FITZSIMMONS

Microbrewery to open in Gloversville: From left, Matt Sherman, Nick Sherman and Casey Oare, the brains and muscle behind Stump City Brewing. PHOTOGRAPHER: DANIEL FITZSIMMONS

Originally published in The Daily Gazette

By Daniel Fitzsimmons, December 18, 2016

For brothers Matt and Nick Sherman, along with their childhood friend, Casey Oare, nearly every weekend for the past three years has been spent building a shared dream conceived nearly six years ago in the Shermans’ garage: to open a brewery together that Gloversville could call its own.

Standing in the now-functioning brewery and taproom recently, which lacked only the finishing touches, the trio — and Stump City Brewing — have come a long way from the garage where they experimented with different homebrew recipes and fantasized about doing something bigger.

“Our motto is ‘from the ground up,’” said Matt Sherman, 34, a reference to the do it yourself-ethos that informs nearly everything they do, from building the structure that houses the brewery and taproom themselves to slogging through the mountains of state and federal paperwork required to operate a brewery.

The other defining feature of Stump City Brewing is their devotion to Gloversville and the surrounding area, and their drive to source everything — from the ingredients in their beer to construction materials — locally.

The bar in the taproom is made from the trees that were cleared to make way for their building. The ceiling is lined with corrugated sheet metal, giving it a rustic look, that a friend had stockpiled and given them. The plank floor is made of reclaimed wood from a nearby house that was gutted.

The project took three years’ worth of weekends because all three men have day jobs. Matt Sherman is a school counselor, Nick Sherman sells bus parts, and Oare is a paramedic and firefighter. Weekends were all spent bringing the dream to life.

Stump City is also taking advantage of New York’s farm brewing law, which provides incentives like decreased permitting requirements to New York-based brewers in exchange for the brewers sourcing a portion of their ingredients inside the state. The purpose of the law is to spur hop and grain production in the state and increase demand for local products.

Under the farm brewery law, at least 20 percent of the brewery’s hops must come from inside the state, and 20 percent of all other ingredients must be native to New York. Those ratios increase to 90 percent each in 2024.

But the Shermans and Oare are already there, sourcing 90 percent of their grain bill from a farm outside Rochester, and all of their hops — for now — from Goddard Tree Farm in Johnstown. Nick Sherman, 30, said there’s a need for increased hop and grain production in the state, which is ideal for growing such crops.

“It’s just a matter of convincing these farmers that there’s money to be made in growing those crops,” said Nick Sherman. “The startup costs are high.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly, their name is local too. Before the area was called Gloversville it was known as “Stump City,” after all the trees that had been cut down to supply bark for the leather tanning process.

The brewery is located on West Fulton Street extension, behind the Sherman family home on land donated by the Shermans’ dad, Jerry Sherman, who is also a partner in the brewery and provided funds to help get the project off the ground.

“We grew up playing in these woods,” said Nick Sherman, looking out the back door of the brewery.

About $13,000 in additional funds was raised through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, which Matt Sherman said was crucial to the finishing of the brewery.
“Without the Indiegogo this wouldn’t have happened,” he said, noting that contributors, depending on how much they donated, will receive perks like Stump City clothing and gear or even the chance to brew an original beer.

And while other crowdfunding campaigns might draw donations from around the world, virtually all of the donations made to Stump City were from friends, relatives and others within the group’s orbit.

“I don’t think there’s one donor we don’t know,” said Matt Sherman. “The support in the community has been huge.”

“We all grew up here,” said Casey Oare, 31. “And for the people who stayed there’s a certain amount of pride being from the area, and we want to be a part of that.”

The group’s goal is to sell beer in their taproom and at local beverage centers where people can fill up their growlers — large, reusable glass containers used to store beer for personal use — with Stump City beer. Eventually they’d like for the brewery to support one of them as a full-time employee, and from there start increasing capacity, which currently stands at around 31 gallons per batch.

They currently have three brews that will be in regular rotation at the taproom; their Cayadutta Cream Ale, which they said is a good entry point to craft beer, a pale ale and a red ale.

Oare said there’s lots of buzz around when the taproom will open, and that he gets questioned by local residents on when they’ll be able to come in for a beer.
“Everybody wants to know when we’re opening,” Oare said.

The group said they want to do a soft opening for family, friends and supporters in the coming weeks, and open the taproom to the general public in the spring.
But they’re in no rush. The Shermans and Oare take a lot of pride in the beer they make, their local roots, and building something that those in Gloversville and the surrounding area can take a measure of ownership in.

“We want to make people proud,” said Matt Sherman. “We want people to be able to say, ‘that’s my beer.’”

Fulton County working to rebuild local economy: Times Union

Officials market low costs, infrastructure to attract companies, people

 By Robert Downen, Originally published in the Albany Times Union

In their quest to reverse economic downturn, Fulton County officials are focusing on three words: Live, work and play.

By 2026, they hope their county will attract residents who want to do all three.

Once the epicenter of the upstate leather industry centered in Gloversville, Fulton County has steadily watched economic opportunities dwindle as niche manufacturing jobs go overseas.

Since 1970, the number of people directly and indirectly employed in the leather trades has dropped from 10,000 to 400, the U.S. Department of Labor said.

“These businesses employed towns,” Johnny Evers, director of government affairs at the Business Council of New York State, said at a seminar on Fulton County economic development Tuesday,

Now — and hopefully, with buy-in from local business leaders and elected officials — county officials are hoping they can transform the area into a hotbed of growth by attracting businesses and young people alike.

Boosters believe they have the resources both in infrastructure and human capital. The question is how to get people to use them.

The pitch is simple: Cheap cost of living, coupled with the factory buildings left over from the heyday of manufacturing, should make Fulton County immediately attractive to those seeking metropolitan amenities at a discounted rate.

“Upstate New York is a beautiful place to explore and enjoy, but in many areas the cost of living can be too high,” Jim Mraz, Fulton County planning director, said in August. “In Fulton County, that’s not the case, and that’s something we’re proud of.”

Add in a low crime rate, a new focus on regional partnerships and the county’s location in the middle of myriad nature destinations, and officials are confident they “can establish Fulton County as one of the Capital Region’s premier economic and residential destinations,” said Charles Potter, chairman of the Fulton County Board of Supervisors.

Since undertaking the development initiative called Jump Start Fulton County in 2014, officials have focused heavily on luring new businesses and young workers to shovel-ready sites.

Fulton and Montgomery counties at that time brought in Mike Mullis, a corporate site selector, to assess the region’s ability to attract large corporations. Mullis identified seven clusters on which the counties should focus, with biomedical research and development, food and beverage services and health care products among them.

By reorienting towards such high-tech sectors, officials hope they can use their location in the middle of what they’re calling the “Tech Triangle” of New York as a selling point. (Both Utica and the Capital Region tout significant biotechnology sectors, and Albany was rated last week as the most friendly place to do business in New York by Forbes).

A cornerstone of that strategy is the Tryon Technology Park in Perth. The 515-acre park, once occupied by the now-shuttered Tryon Detention Center, has been the focus of the Fulton County Industrial Development Agency. Last year it moved in its first tenant, medical marijuana company Vireo Health.

“In the greater Capital Region, there’s a tremendous amount of human capital,” Vireo CEO Ari Hoffnung said in September. “There’s a lot of talent.

“We want to bring back more (than the 325 jobs) that were lost (at Tryon).”

County officials are also banking on growing agricultural industries statewide.

Since 2000, gross domestic product from upstate New York’s dairy sector has increased by more than 38 percent, to more than $600 million, according to the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth.

In this region alone, international yogurt makers Fage and Chobani have created more than 1,650 jobs, making New York the No. 1 yogurt manufacturing state in the country.

rdownen@timesunion.com • 518-454-5018 • @Robert_Downen

Agenda set for export seminar

Export seminar sponsored by the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth and TD Bank
td-bank-logoFCCRGlogoCMYK

Growth Strategies:
Expanding Your Business Internationally

Holiday Inn Johnstown-Gloversville
November 15, 2016

This export seminar includes networking and learning opportunities about potential markets, logistics, available export financing and cutting through red tape while establishing new lines of business between Fulton County, New York, and the world.

8:30 a.m.
Networking and Registration (Continental Breakfast)

9:00 a.m.
Welcome 

  • Ronald Peters, President & CEO, Fulton County Center for Regional Growth
  • Robert Davey, Regional Vice President for Upstate NY, TD Bank

9:10
Managing Payments and Finalizing the Sale

  • Strategies and options for sending and receiving money from overseas – Maria Aldrete, Director of Foreign Exchange Services, TD Securities LLC
  • Strategies for boosting international sales, managing risk and structuring transactions that benefit both buyers and sellers - Andrea Ratay, Vice President, Global Trade Finance, TD Bank

10:00 a.m.
Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management: Discussion with Moderator

  • Supply Chain management: How to move your products internationally with efficiency and strategies to address some of the challenges facing companies – Tom Valentine, Vice President of Sales & Marketing, Mainfreight USA and Carl Erickson, Director of Supply Chain, Plug Power Inc.

10:30 a.m.
Getting Ready to Export: Federal & State Assistance

  • Export Assistance from the federal government- Toni Corsini, NY/NJ Regional Manager, Office of International Trade, U.S. Small Business Administration
  • Export Assistance from the state governmentEdward Kowalewski, Director of International Investment Programs & Private Sector Liaison to the World Bank,  Empire State Development

11:00 a.m.
Legal Environment of Exporting/Importing:

  • How to protect your intellectual property and what to be mindful of from a legal perspective David Miranda, Attorney, Heslin, Rothenberg, Farley & Mesiti P.C.

11:30 a.m.
Break and Networking

12:00 p.m.
Lunch

12:30 p.m.
Special Guest Speaker 

  • Current state of U.S. and Global Economic Landscape – Implications for importers and  exporters– Brittany Baumann, Economist & Macro Strategist, TD Securities LLC

1:00  p.m. Final Words

  • Cedric Carter, Vice President & Senior Relationship Manager, TD Bank

                                                                               fc-positivefultonmontgomeryconnectedforbusinesslogo

Gloversville inventor helps win GE patent

ALEXANDRIA, Va., Aug. 18 – General Electric, Niskayuna, New York, has been assigned a patent (9,417,048) developed by four co-inventors for “capacitive sensor device and method of manufacture.”

The co-inventors are David Richard Esler, Gloversville, NY; Wayne Charles Hasz of Pownal, VT; and Emad Andarawis and Mahadevan Balasubramaniam, both of Ballston Spa, NY.

The patent application was filed on Oct. 31, 2012 (13/665,192).

 

Leader Herald: Lead on new company for Tryon

Fulton County Center for Regional Growth has lead on potential company for new Tryon Technology Park

Lead on potential company: CRG official

June 28, 2016

GLOVERSVILLE – The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth has a good lead on a potential company for the new Tryon Technology Park, an official said.

CRG President and CEO Ron Peters provided scant details at his agency’s board meeting Friday at the CRG office.

When the CRG is pursuing business prospects, few details are made public until the deal is final.

During a report on a “combined county marketing effort,” Peters said the CRG participated in a conference call involving a “qualified lead” for a potential company.

“It went well,” Peters said.

He said the new Tryon Technology Park in Perth may be the proper site if the company wants to move to Fulton County.

Peters also mentioned during the “business marketing inquiries” portion of the meeting that the CRG received a “solid” inquiry through the state. But it was unclear whether he was talking about the same company.

“It could be a regionally significant project,” Peters said.

He said a California company is looking to start up in either Fulton or Montgomery counties.

Peters said the CRG last year participated in about half of 110 economic development conference calls conducted by the state. He said it is a “good system” and the CRG was recently given three proposals by the state identifying “possible leads” for companies.

“There’s work to be done,” Peters said.

He said companies are seeking 250,000 square feet of space with expansion potential. He said companies want buildings with high bays.

“They’re usually looking for existing [facilities], and to retrofit that,” Peters said.

Peters said the CRG has a good handle on its inventory of potential buildings. He said the biggest existing buildings the county has are about 150,000 square feet. He said a lot of companies are looking to move into the New York City market.

Fulton County Industrial Development Agency Executive Director James Mraz said the Tryon park in the towns of Perth and Johnstown will create an opportunity for a business “willing to build.”

“We will now have that place to put them,” Mraz said.

Peters said the current cost for a pre-engineered building is about $80 to $100 per square-foot. He said economic development agencies are receiving “mixed calls” from potential businesses, from Florida up the east coast. He said there are still some “hardcore manufacturers” looking for sites.

Gloversville 3rd Ward Supervisor John Blackmon, county liaison to the CRG, said some buildings of the future may be occupied by only 3D printers.

Michael Anich covers Johnstown and Fulton County news. He can be reached at manich@leaderherald.com

Up to $25K available for startup companies in Fulton County

Small and startup companies in Fulton County can get a piece of a $185,000 grant pool called the Microenterprise Grant Program, but they must apply soon.

La Villa Dog Works, which describes itself as a two-person, one dog shop, makes dog collars and leashes and sells them online and its retail store in Johnstown. It's expansion was boosted last year with a loan from the Microenterprise Grant Program administered by CRG.

La Villa Dog Works, which describes itself as a two-person, one-dog shop, makes dog collars and leashes and sells them online and its retail store in Johnstown. Its expansion was boosted last year with a $25,000 loan from the Microenterprise Grant Program administered by CRG.

 The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth administers the program, which seeks to boost the chances of young and start up businesses with five or fewer full-time employees, one of whom is the owner. The program offers up to $25,000 in seed money per applicant to be used for new businesses or expansions that create jobs. The money comes from a federal Community Development Block Grant, filtered through the state Office of Community Renewal.

CRG President and CEO Ron Peters said the CRG hopes to award money by July. Applicants must go through a training process that includes a general overview of business; accounting, taxes and finance; marketing and e-commerce; and development of a business plan. There is a $100 fee for the training, which can be expensed to the Microenterprise Grant funds.

L&L embroidery

In last year’s round of Microenterprise Grant Program Funding, L&L Embroidery of 258 County Highway 142, Johnstown received $25,000. The company does custom embroidery on apparel and accessories.

Facial room at SW Skin Care & Cosmetics in Johnstown NY

SW Skin Care & Cosmetics, Inc., an esthetician and day spa in Johnstown, received $15,000 from the Microenterprise Grant program last year.

Training sessions will be held June 15-16, and June 22-23 at the Fulton Montgomery Regional Chamber of Commerce office on North Main Street.

Companies that received Microenterprise Grant Program funding in 2015 included LaVilla Dog Works, 11 S. Market St., Johnstown – $25,000; SW Skin Care & Cosmetics, Inc. of 86 Briggs St., Johnstown – $15,000; and L&L Embroidery of 258 County Highway 142, Johnstown – $25,000.

Southern Adirondack Wine & Food Festival


Southern Adirondack Wine & Food Festival Logo

 

Sunday, June 12, 2016

1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

2 N. Main Street

Gloversville, NY

Isntitsweet

Tastings of wine, cider and whisky

Hudson-Chatham WineryHummingbird Hill WineryLedge Rock Hill WineryPazdar Winery, Nine Pin CiderYankee Distillers

◊ Delicious local food

The Brass Monkey, On A Roll, Mohawk Harvest Co-opNYC PizzaSugar PearlPalatine CheeseIce Delites, Isn’t It SweetThe Nut LadyFork Art

Live music

Chelsea Reeves
GCM Wind Quintet
Baker Brass Trio
Cosby Gibson & Tom Staudle
Doghouse Trio
Penny Jar

Wine seminars

The basics of wine making and wine tasting

Art  and Craft Shows

Primitive Pimp Design
My Inner 1800s 
The Leaning Tree

◊ Architectural tours

In historic downtown Gloversville

◊ Plus….

French-themed Paint N Sip ($5 additional fee for supplies)

The Southern Adirondack Wine & Food Festival is sponsored by:

GOLD SPONSOR:
Fulton County Center for Regional Growth

SILVER SPONSORS:
Adirondack Wood Floor Co.
Mohawk Harvest Co-op
The Still Point Acupuncture

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Downtown Gloversville video shows plans for development

This in-depth video shows the 2016 development plan for downtown Gloversville, NY.