Fulton County, New York – Positive

You have one life.
Don’t spend it on someone else’s dream.
You have the fire. You have the potential.
You will rise to the challenge.

Fulton County believes in you.
This is your new frontier
The place where your side hustle becomes the next big thing.

We are positive.

We are ready for you now.
Fulton County has the plan and the infrastructure,
the untapped resources,
and affordable architectural treasures to start your imagination as well as your business.

Fulton County welcomes the risk takers
the visionary creators
the artisans
the passionate entrepreneurs.
We honor bold ideas and unconventional thinking.
We offer you inspiring vistas
44 lakes,
a sense of community
and places you can afford to call your own.
This is where you start.
This is positively your time.
This is positively your place.
This is YOUR Fulton County.
Fulton County, New York
Positive

Fulton County working to rebuild local economy: Times Union

Officials market low costs, infrastructure to attract companies, people

 By Robert Downen, Originally published in the Albany Times Union

In their quest to reverse economic downturn, Fulton County officials are focusing on three words: Live, work and play.

By 2026, they hope their county will attract residents who want to do all three.

Once the epicenter of the upstate leather industry centered in Gloversville, Fulton County has steadily watched economic opportunities dwindle as niche manufacturing jobs go overseas.

Since 1970, the number of people directly and indirectly employed in the leather trades has dropped from 10,000 to 400, the U.S. Department of Labor said.

“These businesses employed towns,” Johnny Evers, director of government affairs at the Business Council of New York State, said at a seminar on Fulton County economic development Tuesday,

Now — and hopefully, with buy-in from local business leaders and elected officials — county officials are hoping they can transform the area into a hotbed of growth by attracting businesses and young people alike.

Boosters believe they have the resources both in infrastructure and human capital. The question is how to get people to use them.

The pitch is simple: Cheap cost of living, coupled with the factory buildings left over from the heyday of manufacturing, should make Fulton County immediately attractive to those seeking metropolitan amenities at a discounted rate.

“Upstate New York is a beautiful place to explore and enjoy, but in many areas the cost of living can be too high,” Jim Mraz, Fulton County planning director, said in August. “In Fulton County, that’s not the case, and that’s something we’re proud of.”

Add in a low crime rate, a new focus on regional partnerships and the county’s location in the middle of myriad nature destinations, and officials are confident they “can establish Fulton County as one of the Capital Region’s premier economic and residential destinations,” said Charles Potter, chairman of the Fulton County Board of Supervisors.

Since undertaking the development initiative called Jump Start Fulton County in 2014, officials have focused heavily on luring new businesses and young workers to shovel-ready sites.

Fulton and Montgomery counties at that time brought in Mike Mullis, a corporate site selector, to assess the region’s ability to attract large corporations. Mullis identified seven clusters on which the counties should focus, with biomedical research and development, food and beverage services and health care products among them.

By reorienting towards such high-tech sectors, officials hope they can use their location in the middle of what they’re calling the “Tech Triangle” of New York as a selling point. (Both Utica and the Capital Region tout significant biotechnology sectors, and Albany was rated last week as the most friendly place to do business in New York by Forbes).

A cornerstone of that strategy is the Tryon Technology Park in Perth. The 515-acre park, once occupied by the now-shuttered Tryon Detention Center, has been the focus of the Fulton County Industrial Development Agency. Last year it moved in its first tenant, medical marijuana company Vireo Health.

“In the greater Capital Region, there’s a tremendous amount of human capital,” Vireo CEO Ari Hoffnung said in September. “There’s a lot of talent.

“We want to bring back more (than the 325 jobs) that were lost (at Tryon).”

County officials are also banking on growing agricultural industries statewide.

Since 2000, gross domestic product from upstate New York’s dairy sector has increased by more than 38 percent, to more than $600 million, according to the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth.

In this region alone, international yogurt makers Fage and Chobani have created more than 1,650 jobs, making New York the No. 1 yogurt manufacturing state in the country.

rdownen@timesunion.com • 518-454-5018 • @Robert_Downen

Business Leaders Push for Regional Development

The CEO Roundtable plays a vital role in holding counties and municipalities accountable

Vision artBuilding a vital future for our region takes all hands on deck. That’s why, in 2011, small but vital group of Montgomery and Fulton County business leaders formed The CEO Roundtable. Their vision? To create a business-friendly climate that would help the region retain existing businesses and attract new ones.

Today the CEO Roundtable members continue to promote the vision they created in their  2011 Regional Business Plan:

“The Fulton-Montgomery County Region is a progressive community providing a friendly climate for business growth and retention, a variety of entertainment venues for social gathering, an educated and trained workforce, and a diverse housing stock to meet the needs of the different lifestyles of its residents.”

Guided today by core members Dustin Swanger, president of Fulton Montgomery Community College,; Mike Reese, president of Fulton County Center for Regional Growth; Ken Rose, director of the Montgomery County Business Development Center; Jim Mraz, Fulton County planning director; Mark Kilmer, CEO of the Fulton-Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce; and Pat Michel, district superintendent of HFM BOCES; the group continues to advance the work of 6 primary goals established in that plan.

1. Educate and train the region’s students for a 21st century workforce.

Area schools have begun implementing the new common core standards to better prepare students for college and careers. BOCES is collaborating with area districts on curriculum and to ensure access to learning opportunities. Both a technology-focused high school and Apprentice Program are underway. Technology-enabled faculty-sharing is in development among school districts. BOCES and the FM Chamber sponsored a Career Fair for eighth-grade students. And several districts are regionalizing some operations (transportation, food service, etc.) to control costs.

Additionally, as reported here in October, Fulton Montgomery Community College (FMCC) has invested heavily in technology on-campus (a new clean-room and automated manufacturing lab, high-tech patient simulators, new computers, iPads and software), launched new degree programs, and modified several programs to reflect the skills needed by area business and industry.

2. Develop large and small shovel-ready sites. Fulton County has been working with New York State to transfer ownership of Tryon Park to the Fulton County IDA, which will provide a new business and industry park, complete with infrastructure, ready for development. Montgomery County has been working to expand the Florida Park Extension in preparation for new potential industries.

3. Market the region. Both counties have been developing marketing outreach efforts singly and together. A joint effort brought site selector Michael Mullis to the region in early September to highlight the number of sites available in our region and to promote the region’s business strengths:

  • Location (proximity to major throughways and easy access to markets throughout the Northeast)
  • Available workforce
  • Affordable land
  • Year-round recreational activities
  • Low cost of living

4. Improve the region’s quality of life. Another important focus is revitalizing our downtowns. To that end, the CEO Roundtable has hosted two symposia for government and business leaders from Amsterdam, Gloversville, and Johnstown to learn, brainstorm, and begin efforts to enhance our cities.

5. Extend water, sewer, utilities, and broadband service. The CEO Roundtable strongly advocates Fulton County’s exploration of a county-wide water and sewer system, which will make the county much more attractive to new and growing businesses.

6. Lower local property tax burden in the region. Our local counties and school districts have been doing all they can to control spending without crippling services. But a region can only shrink to success for so long. The only true way to control the property tax burden is to grow the base so that costs can be spread among more residents, businesses, and industries. That is why the entire Regional Business Development Plan is focused on growth.

Concludes Dustin Swanger, a founding member of The CEO Roundtable, “The CEO Roundtable, along with others in our community, has been working hard to implement the Regional Business Development Plan. We are focused on improving our region and making it a better place to live, work, and play.”

Downtown Gloversville – Fulton Street

Fulton County NY

Gloversville is full of exceptional building for retail and office space.

 

Gloversville

Gloversville, New York

Downtown District in Gloversville NY. Beautiful buildings and architecture with many available storefronts waiting for incredible businesses to join the community.

Crossroads Industrial Park, Johnstown NY – in Fulton County

Fulton County's  Crossroads Industrial Park  located in Johnstown, NY

Aerial view of Fulton County’s Crossroads Industrial Park located in Johnstown, NY

The Crossroads Industrial Park is ideal for manufacturing/distribution, warehousing & food processing. 

• Average acres per lot: 3
• Proximity to NYS Thruway: 7 miles

Utilities Available at Each Park

• Natural Gas
• Electric
• Water
• Sewer
• Heavy-duty road network
• Direct wire to police and fire protection
• Close proximity to state-of-the-art landfill
• Fiber optic telecommunication

Call for details and current availability

The Glove Theater in Downtown Gloversville

The Glove Theater, located on Main Street.

The Glove Theater, located on Main Street.

The Glove Theater Performing Arts Center is located at 42 North Main Street in Gloversville NY. The Theater was constructed in 1914 by Henry Cady and George Dartch. The Marquee was added to the structure in 1939 as the theater became the premier venue for entertainment in Fulton County in the 1940’s and fifties. Currently the Theater is the location of several live performances each year.

Gloversville Architecture in Fulton County, NY

Located in Downtown Gloversville, the Fulton Montgomery Chamber of Commerce is a historic structure on the corner of Fulton and Main Streets.

Located in Downtown Gloversville, the Fulton Montgomery Chamber of Commerce is a historic structure on the corner of Fulton and Main Streets.

The Mohawk Harvest Cooperative Market, Gloversville NY

The Mohawk Harvest, located in Downtown Gloversville NY

The Mohawk Harvest, located in Downtown Gloversville NY

In 2009 Mohawk Harvest began on Main Street in Gloversville, NY.

They support local farms by selling their products. They are a major hub in the revitalization of downtown Gloversville. The store also features a coffee shop and an art gallery that showcases local artists and craftsmen.

Johnstown Industrial Park, Fulton County NY

Johnstown NY, Gloversville NY

Crossroads Industrial Park is located in Johnstown NY, In Fulton County New York.

Aerial View of the the industrial park in Johnstown, NY that is the home to the Walmart Distribution Center, Fage Yogurt, and Euphrates Cheese. Fulton County NY is becoming a Food Processing Hub in Upstate New York. We have exceptional natural resources and incredible infrastructure, to make a perfect location for advanced manufacturing, food processing and dairy production.

 

City Hall, Johnstown NY

Johnstown NY

City Hall in Johnstown NY

 

The Johnstown NY City Hall was built circa 1927. It house most of the department of the City Government. It is located on East Main Street in the City of Johnstown NY.