Open House at Frozen Parts, Inc.


Open House at Frozen Parts, Inc.

CRG was invited to attend the 1st Annual Open House at Frozen Parts on Wednesday, June 28, 2017. Located at 19 Washington Street in Gloversville, NY, the flyer for the event promised “Food, Fun, Ice Cream and Demonstrations.” They did not disappoint.

I arrived at the start of the event and met up with Nancy Reccio of FMS Workforce Development, Kent Kirch of CRG’s Board of Directors, Halie Northrop from Congresswoman Elise Stefanik’s office, and Gloversville Mayor, Dayton King among other guests. Frozen Parts’ President and Owner, Jim Law, was on hand to tell us about the demonstrations we would see later during the event. He also said that Frozen Parts can manufacture around 500 different parts products!

We started off with lunch – hot dogs, burgers, lunch meat, cold salads, chips… and of course, ice cream from Meco’s Perfect Scoop. I told you they did not disappoint! The ice cream I was expecting. They are Frozen Parts, after all… But this was over the top good. A complete spread for lunch and a sundae bar. Check out the toppings.


DSC00835

 

After lunch, Michael Trumble provided a demonstration of the manufacturing process of a Frozen Parts heat exchanger. The photos below show him measuring and cutting the piping, laying the two pieces in the wooden tray with a bead of solder, and melting the solder with an electrical current. Very cool! He said that it makes a strong, even connection between the two pieces of pipe. Once it is cooled, the pipe is threaded through an insulated sleeve and curled to the needed diameter for a specific refrigeration/cooling unit.

DSC00846 DSC00845 DSC00850 DSC00853 DSC00855

Kim Dingman then provided a demonstration of the bending of Plexiglas freezer covers. She places a pre-cut piece of glass onto a wooden frame which holds the flat piece at a precise location so that the part that needs to bend is above a heating element. The heat then softens the Plexiglas until it is malleable and can be bent into a 90 degree angle. The piece is then clipped onto a wooden tray that keeps the side piece upright until it cools. It can then be finished off to fit a dipping freezer. It was estimated that Frozen Parts shipped around 1500 if these covers last year.

DSC00856

DSC00857

DSC00858 DSC00860

Jim Law served up the sweet stuff. Quite generously, I might add. Ice cream flavors of the day were Meco’s Perfect Scoop’s Vanilla and Peanut Butter Cup. I’m not a vanilla girl so I had the peanut butter cup. SO, SO GOOD! If you have not had a chance to try Meco’s Perfect Scoop ice cream, you simply must go right now and get some. It is delicious. I decked mine out with some sundae goodies and loved every spoonful.

Below you’ll find some pics of Jim serving ice cream to his grandkids, Andrew and Avery. You’ll also see pics of the ice cream carts and custom scoop sinks that are made in his shop, right in the heart of Gloversville.

DSC00836 DSC00868

DSC00869 DSC00839 DSC00864 DSC00834

Also on display were Frozen Parts’ ice cream container collars and lids, including a new see-through lid.

DSC00862 DSC00861 DSC00863

Kent Kirch told me that he loves being able to visit local businesses because so often, we drive through our community without ever knowing what actually goes on inside these manufacturing buildings. I agree. It is so fascinating to see how things are made and to find out what the businesses that are in our community actually do. So I encourage everyone reading this to take some time to visit our downtowns and take a peek into the store fronts, read the names on the manufacturing buildings, and try to find a way to make Fulton County’s businesses more a part of your greater consciousness and shopping routine.

In the mean time, have a great summer day!

Written by: Becky Hatcher, CRG Executive Assistant

P.S. You can view details about the above finished products, and more, on the Frozen Parts website. Click here for more!

TU: Fulton County shows off business park, medical marijuana tenant

If your business is anything like a medical marijuana facility, economic developers in Fulton County want you to know they have a perfect location for it.

You don’t have to be making medicines from plants that were until recently illegal to grow. Fulton County officials are looking for businesses that need lots of affordable space in a secure, remote location with access to a workforce that has a wide range of education and skills. That’s what Vireo Health of New York, one of five medical marijuana companies operating in the state, got when it moved into the 213-acre Tryon Technology Park two years ago.

“Fulton County has been a terrific partner for us,” Vireo Chief Executive Ari Hoffnung said Wednesday at a county event pitching the site of a former state juvenile detention center to a couple dozen real estate brokers.

“It’s a perfect fit,” Fulton County Planning Director James Mraz said of Vireo’s location.

As the unique business park’s only tenant, Vireo was a natural selling point. Real estate brokers got a rare tour of the strictly regulated facility.

They got to see an outdoor greenhouse and indoor grow rooms where horticulturists carefully control the light and temperature of plants whose oils are extracted for medicines to treat 11 debilitating conditions approved by the state.  They got to peek into the laboratory where the medicines are made, in different formulations of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a mind-altering ingredient, and cannabidiol (CBD), which has no psychoactive properties.

 Yet as an example of a thriving business, Vireo isn’t there yet. Hoffnung told county officials and real estate brokers that the firm has invested about $10 million in the operation, including 20 acres of land. But like the other four medical marijuana companies in New York, it has yet to break even.

That’s despite a huge boost — an increase in volume of more than 50 percent, according to Vireo Operations Director Nick Goran — since the state added chronic pain to its list of qualifying conditions less than three months ago. One impediment to growth, company officials said, is that too few doctors are registering to certify patients for medical marijuana. According to the state Health Department, 1,058 medical providers were registered as of last week.

The business park landed Vireo as a client without much work, Mraz said. The company found the park as the county was engaged in getting the facility ready to market, Mraz said.

Mraz raised an eyebrow when he told about first hearing of interest from a potential tenant that wanted to grow marijuana. But then he learned more about Vireo’s plans. “Ah, you’re a pharmaceutical company,” he said.

WRGB sees growth potential for Fulton County

They’re both headquartered in our area.

The center of Fulton County is about 45 miles from Albany, and with two successful businesses operating there, right now county leaders are hoping to attract even more companies.

Vireo Health CEO Ari Hoffnung was born and raised in New York City, but he decided to manufacture medical marijuana in the quiet countryside of Johnstown.

“Got a great deal on 20 acres and now we have enough space our business can grow into,” Hoffnung said.

Security is extremely important for a medical marijuana operation, which is why Hoffnung says this was a prime location, an old youth corrections facility.

The old inmate living quarters now house the plants used to make kosher forms of the state-regulated drug.

Hoffnung says he saw an opportunity to bring the old Tryon Juvenile Prison buildings back to life, and put Fulton County residents back to work.

“Hundreds of jobs were lost and being able to bring jobs back was extraordinarily important,” Hoffnung said.

But now Hoffnung is looking for neighbors on the prison property, which has been transformed into the Tryon Technology Park, several hundred acres of shovel-ready space.

“We would welcome biotech companies we would welcome medical device companies it’s a great place to do business,” Hoffnung said.

County Planning Director Jim Mraz says the county’s been working to prepare the land in two nearby areas, Hales Mills and Vail Mills, for anticipated residential growth.

“We’re looking at upwards of 900 housing units county-wide in demand,” Mraz said.

They’re hoping the success of Fage yogurt, headquartered just eight miles from the medical marijuana site, will also help businesses look their way.

“We’re so proud they’re here, and we’d like to see more companies like that,” Mraz said.

County leaders say one of their biggest challenges is changing perception. Because the county is mostly rural, leaders say folks tend to think it’s hours away from the Capital Region, but the drive to Johnstown about 40 minutes from Schenectady.

by Anne McCloy, WRGB 6News Albany

Wednesday, June 21st 2017

WNYT finds Fulton County Posi+tive

Presentations highlight business opportunities in Fulton County

June 21, 2017 05:56 PM

PERTH – Fulton County wants companies to know it is open for business. County officials highlighted shovel-ready areas around the county for businesses to move in at a presentation Wednesday. The county highlighted those opportunities at Tryon Technology Park, and branded their new slogan – Fulton County: Posi+ive.

It may seem like an unusual place for a rebirth, an old juvenile detention facility. But at the Tryon Technology Park, Fulton County sees a bright business future for the county. “It was really a day to talk about investment opportunities, real estate development opportunities that we have here in Fulton County, readily available,” said James Mraz, Fulton County’s Planning Director.

The county brought in members of the Commercial and Industrial Real Estate Brokers to talk about opportunities for businesses and families in Fulton County. “We know what we’re doing, we know the opportunities that are here, but it doesn’t do us any good to know them and not for everybody else to,” said Mraz.

The county is focusing on three main sites. A planned residential and retail development in Johnstown and other in Mayfield. But the main area they focused on Wednesday was the Tryon Technology Park in the Town of Perth. The county got the property after the detention facility shut down in 2011. They’ve spent the last two years, and more than five million dollars, getting it ready for business.

“It’s one thing to have the land available, but if that land isn’t supported by the infrastructure it’s really not shovel-ready,” said Mraz. One tenant is already at the Technology Park: Vireo Health. A medical marijuana grower licensed by the state, the company credits the county for their growth.

“Fulton County and its IDA have been true partners to us,” said Ari Hoffnung, CEO of Vireo Health of NY, LLC. “We couldn’t do what we’re doing without their support.”

Vireo praised the county’s investments at Tryon, and say they’re ready for new tenants to come in. “Infrastructure here is top notch when it comes to power, when it comes to water, when it comes to high speed internet access,” said Hoffnung. “And it’s getting a little lonely so we would love a few more neighbors.”

Credits

Ben Amey

Copyright 2017 – WNYT-TV, LLC A Hubbard Broadcasting Company

Townsend Leather expansion project approved

The former Diana Knitting Mill off North Perry and Grove streets in Johnstown is being groomed for Townsend Leather's expansion. (The Leader-Herald/Michael Anich)

The former Diana Knitting Mill off North Perry and Grove streets in Johnstown is being groomed for Townsend Leather’s expansion. (The Leader-Herald/Michael Anich)

By Michael Anich

Originally published in The Leader-Herald

JOHNSTOWN — The city Planning Board on Tuesday approved a request by Townsend Leather to renovate the former Diana Knitting Mill building on North Perry Street so it can expand and create more than 50 new jobs to start.

Townsend Leather on Townsend Avenue, which dyes and produces leather goods for vendors throughout the world, has been in business since 1969.

The former Diana Knitting Mill at 229 N. Perry St. is a three-parcel, multi-building connected complex that has been empty for more than 15 years.

Townsend Leather Design showroom in Fulton County NY

The showroom at Townsend Leather’s existing headquarters in Johnstown.

The Fulton County Center for Regional Growth has been working with Townsend Leather on its project. The only speaker at a board public hearing Tuesday on the project at City Hall was CRG President and CEO Ronald Peters.

“We are in full support of the project,” Peters said.

He also thanked Mayor Vern Jackson for helping the manufacturing project come together. He said the life expectancy of the former Diana Knit building is only two years and Townsend will be breathing new life into the structure.

Planning Board member Fred Franko praised improvements planned by Townsend Leather.

“I think it’s a home run,” Franko said of the project. “Fabulous. We’re really looking forward to it.”

Stitchery Realty LLC and the JC Group LLC –on behalf of Townsend — requested to renovate the Diana complex at the corner of North Perry and Grove streets. The complex includes a 66,000-square-foot building, of which 47,000 square feet is a three-story, former knitting mill; and a 19,000-square-foot, two-story addition built in 1988 with conveyer system.

Townsend is seeking a new business operating permit for the mill area, where zoning in that part of Johnstown is currently classified as commercial. There are no zoning issues. The eventual Townsend operation would include manufacturing equipment, dry drums and a leather buffing machine. One side of the complex would hire up to 12 people to start and the brick side of the plant facing Grove Street would involve about 40 employees to start.

Stitchery submitted a letter to the city stating, in part: “Construction on the building will be to focus on getting it back up to code and capable of leasing out. There are a few small out buildings on the southwest section of the Grove Street building parcel. These buildings were to house old boilers, which may need to come down as the roofs are in disrepair. The remainder of the building will be planned for future rental space for startup manufacturers, potential office space and even some co-working offices with shared services. These would be developed after the first phase of construction is complete and the building is up to code to be leased out.”

In other business, Franko reported the board received a letter regarding a possible replacement of a 185-foot tower project on Union Avenue Extension. The possible concern is the property — lying outside the Johnstown Industrial Park — might be a historic property.

Fire Chief Bruce Heberer, the city’s code enforcement officer, said there’s a tower there already. He said the tower may be replaced.

“I don’t think there’s anything of historic development out there,” Heberer said.

He said the tower height is similar to one existing at the Fulton County sheriff’s office on Route 29.

Franko directed City Engineer Christopher Vose, who sits on the board, to make some contacts and learn more about the tower project.

Michael Anich covers Johnstown and Fulton County news. He can be reached at manich@leaderherald.com.

Elected Officials Tour Pioneer Window

June 6, 2017, may have been a rainy day here in Fulton County, but at Pioneer Window, the view was bright and sunny. We held the first of our monthly business tours for the local elected officials, and we were delighted to see inside this manufacturing company, located in the Johnstown Industrial Park at 200 Union Avenue.

DSC00603Pioneer Window’s Vice President of Manufacturing, Eric Miller, graciously hosted our party of 15. He began by briefing us on the history of Pioneer Window in Fulton County and brought us into the present by describing their current projects in New York City. They are working on several projects there at this time ranging from schools to high rise apartment buildings.

DSC00606DSC00605DSC00608

Mr. Miller then took us on a tour of the window manufacturing facility. It is a busy place, full of employees building windows, cleaning the glass on finished products, and  preparing them for shipment. We got to see the entire process, including state-of-the-art robotic tools used to cut and prepare window components. Most employees, however, still assemble the basic window structure by hand and it is fascinating to watch.

DSC00634DSC00632DSC00641DSC00645DSC00643DSC00652

Each step in the process was explained during the tour. We even got to see a display model of one project in particular to see what the finished project would look like.

DSC00621DSC00615DSC00656

We all learned so much about this business that has been quietly evaluating its operation and searching for ways to diversify within their niche. They not only survived the economic down-turn that effected us all, but are now thriving and continue to ramp up production. The employees at Pioneer Window were all courteous and happy – diligently working during our visit, despite having a group of 15 people watching them and asking questions. They even put up with us getting in the way of fork lift trucks and hand carts – all with smiles.

DSC00666DSC00653DSC00668

Special thanks go to Eric Miller at Pioneer Window – a great tour guide and host! Below is a group picture, taken at the end of our tour. I would also like to thank the elected officials and CRG Directors that supported this tour. Fulton County has great employers and we look forward to highlighting more of them in the months to come!

DSC00684

written by Becky Hatcher, CRG Executive Assistant

Testimonial from CMK & Associates Real Estate

CMK Testimonial (2)

Gloversville Public Library celebrations planned

Two events to celebrate renovations

GLOVERSVILLE — The Gloversville Public Library will be hosting two events to celebrate the upcoming renovation of the more than 100-year-old building.

Lisa Buggeln, the library board of trustees’ vice president of finance, said the open house will start with a ribbon cutting ceremony likely at the West Fulton Street entrance.

KERRY MINOR
Reporter
kminor@leaderherald.com
DSC00546bOriginally published in The Leader-Herald, MAY 6, 2017

Buggeln said there will be a number of children’s activities throughout the event including face painting and make-your-own bookmark craft.

A scavenger hunt will take place to get people acclimated to the layout of the space. Every visitor will get a floor map of the library and the location of the various events going on. Scavenger hunts can be done by kids, teenagers and adults.

“When [children] come back with [the hunt] completed they will get a little goody bag,” she said.

Those who participate in the scavenger hunt will get a coupon for the raffle of one of three prize baskets that will be offered: one for adults, one for teenagers and one for children.

The event will run from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on May 13.

“It’s introducing everyone to where we are now,” Buggeln said. “We really want people to know where the temporary space is and the layout.”

Library staff will also be on hand to answer questions.

The library opened in its temporary location at the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth at 34 W. Fulton St. on April 24. The move was precipitated by the a total overhaul of the more than 110-year-old Andrew Carnegie-funded library over the next 14 to 24 months.

At 6 p.m. on May 18, the library will hold a kickoff event at the library’s permanent home at 58 E. Fulton St. The kickoff will celebrate the start of the construction.

“It says we’re starting, we are actually doing this,” Buggeln said.

The event will see the public be able to come and see the emptied out space before the construction starts.

Participants will be able to better envision what the space will look like after the construction is complete with the help of a little tape. gloversville-library-NYBuggeln said tape will be used on the floor to show where items and spaces will be after the building undergoes a total renovation.

Buggeln said two donors are paying for Union Hall Inn to cater the event.

Changes at the property will include new meeting rooms, additional niches for reading, installation of air conditioning and new handicapped accessibility, including an elevator.

The basement will be transformed into a center for children with a dedicated space for teens, something the library staff and board all agree is something that is needed for the area.

Even with all of the changes, the historic aspects — with the exception of the boiler and radiators — will be staying. This includes the distinctive grand staircases.

The library will also be installing an elevator. This installation will be accomplished by putting on an addition to the side of the building. An identical addition will be put on the opposite side of the building for symmetry per the state Historic Preservation Board.

Buggeln said invitations have gone out to everyone who donated to the library’s capital campaign. The capital campaign raised over $8 million for the renovation.

The library board will be voting to approve contracts for the project sometime this month, after which the work can get started.

Buggeln said the library staff and board are hopeful contracts will begin a week after the kickoff party.

Gloversville storefronts to be restored

DeSantis’ downtown project approved
Plans to turn 2 buildings into retail, living space

GLOVERSVILLE –Vincent DeSantis’ plan for renovating a downtown building has been approved by the city’s planning board, with hopes to have retail businesses in place by the end of the summer.

On Tuesday, DeSantis was given the green light for a plan to overhaul the exterior of 31 N. Main St. and convert the first floor from an office into a retail establishment.

DeSantis, the Third Ward Councilman and a former city court judge, purchased 31 and 33 N. Main St. in October and plans to renovate both buildings.

The property at 31 N. Main St. will undergo the greatest change.

The building, which currently features a white marble front with three small windows near the top of the first floor, will be overhauled with a goal of bringing back its Victorian-era storefront.

DeSantis is hoping to apply for state and federal Historic Preservation tax credits for 31 N. Main St.

“It is building that has been modernized on the front to the point that it does not [conform] with the historic character of downtown. Changing that back to a Victorian front may qualify for tax breaks,” DeSantis said.

Inside the building, the first floor will be transformed to potentially house two businesses. The second floor will be turned into two loft-style apartments.

There will possibly be another apartment on the third floor, but that will take more time to complete, since it has gone untouched for several decades.

“That’s a really big project. At this point, there is only a ladder and hatchway up to the third floor, and it’s really closed off,” he said. “When you go up the ladder, it’s like a time capsule. It’s stepping back in time to 1910. Everything is deteriorated, the plaster is coming off the walls, you can see the lath in places.”

DeSantis said he is hopeful that within five years the space can be developed into a full apartment.

DeSantis said he has two prospective tenants that are interested in opening up in the space: a bakery/cafe and a juice bar. There will be limited seating available in the space, including some on a planned deck.

He said he hopes to have the businesses and second floor apartments occupied by the end of the summer. He said he has spoken with a couple contractors already about the project.

“Once it gets going, I think it will be very quickly,” DeSantis said.

DeSantis said the tenant at 33 N. Main St. left at the end of April, and someone is interested in taking the space. The one-story building is already zoned for retail. No planning board approval was needed for that property at this point, since there will be no exterior changes to the building.

The building will need minimal work to get it ready for a new tenant. DeSantis does plan to put in some new flooring and work to expose a tin ceiling that is currently covered by a drop ceiling.

“As opposed to [31 N. Main], 33 was very well maintained,” DeSantis said.

DeSantis said he thought that with the eastern side of North Main Street seeing development in the form of the Mohawk Harvest Cooperative Market, Schine Memorial Hall and City National Commons, that it was time for the western side of the street to see some new renovations.

“I just think that right now there is a lot of energy going into downtown. A lot of psychological energy and there is a lot of investment downtown,” he said. “Somehow, that had to jump across the street. It had to synergize with something on the other side of the street.”

DeSantis said that the two buildings had been for sale for a long period of time, and he thought they were small enough that he could financially handle the renovations.

DeSantis said the renovations and new businesses could help with the application for the state’s second round of the $10 million Downtown Revitalization Initiative grant.

The state will again be awarding 10 communities across New York $10 million for downtown improvement plans.

DeSantis said that it could be helpful for the application to show improvements are already being made.

“Whenever you apply for something like that, they give you points if they feel something is already happening in the downtown,” he said. “So it does help the application.”

DeSantis said elected officials are disqualified from receiving money from the state for this program.

Kerry Minor can be reached at kminor@leaderherald.com.

Business to expand into Diana Knit site

The former Diana Knitting Mill off North Perry and Grove streets in Johnstown is being groomed for Townsend Leather's expansion. (The Leader-Herald/Michael Anich)

The former Diana Knitting Mill off North Perry and Grove streets in Johnstown is being groomed for Townsend Leather’s expansion. (The Leader-Herald/Michael Anich

MIKE ANICH
Reporter
manich@leaderherald.com
Originally published in The Leader-Herald, May 3, 2017

JOHNSTOWN — Townsend Leather plans to expand into the former, vacant Diana Knitting Mill complex at North Perry and Grove streets, eventually creating more than 50 new jobs to start.

The renewal and manufacturing project was unveiled by Townsend representative Stitchery Realty LLC to the city Planning Board Tuesday at City Hall.

“We’ve been looking at floor space throughout the city,” Tim Beckett of Stitchery told the board.

He said Townsend could have looked elsewhere, but decided to stay in the city of Johnstown.

Townsend Leather on Townsend Avenue, which dyes and produces leather goods for vendors throughout the world, has been in business since 1969.

The former Diana Knitting Mill at 229 N. Perry St. is a three-parcel, multi-building connected complex that has been empty for more than 15 years.

The complex includes a 66,000-square-foot building, of which 47,000 square feet is a three-story, former knitting mill; and a 19,000-square-foot, two-story addition built in 1988 with conveyer system.

Beckett said Townsend is seeking a new business operating permit for the mill area. Zoning in that part of Johnstown is currently classified as commercial. There are no zoning issues. He said the eventual Townsend operation would include manufacturing equipment, dry drums and a leather buffing machine. He said one side of the complex would hire up to 12 people to start and the brick side of the plant facing Grove Street would involve about 40 employees to start.

But Beckett cautioned that much work has to be done to the building and the new Townsend operation may not come to fruition for a year to two years.

According to an informational letter from Stitchery Realty LLC to the planning board, Townsend is under contract to purchase the former mill.

“The contract is contingent on structural, environmental and zoning approval for industrial manufacturing at the site,” the Stitchery letter states.

The letter notes the existing parcels need to be changed, altered or granted a variance prior to purchase.

“We have an agreement with [Townsend] to lease one-third of the building with an option to take half of the space should we have manufacturing on these parcels,” the letter says. “The local manufacturer’s production will be inclusive of the building. There would be no external exhaust or wastewater additions to the building nor would they be emitting any particles. The lease and purchase of this building are dependent upon manufacturing at the [former] Diana Mill.”

The letter says the plan is not to “alter the existing footprint” of the building.

“Construction on the building will be to focus on getting it back up to code and capable of leasing out,” the letter states. “There are a few small out buildings on the southwest section of the Grove Street building parcel. These buildings were to house old boilers, which may need to come down as the roofs are in disrepair. The remainder of the building will be planned for future rental space for startup manufacturers, potential office space and even some co-working offices with shared services. These would be developed after the first phase of construction is complete and the building is up to code to be leased out.”

“Parking is a tough scenario for us,” Beckett said.

But he said his firm has been in touch with nearby JAVAC, to possibly use some of its parking spaces.

Beckett said a two-year plan for the complex is to take out some trees around the building and windows will be replaced.

The board voted to hold a public hearing on the project for 4 p.m. June 6 at City Hall. The board also voted itself lead agency for the state Environmental Quality Review process that is required.

Michael Anich covers Johnstown and Fulton County news. He can be reached at manich@leaderherald.com.